What to See in Rome

by NeemTime.com Editors
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What to See in Rome

What to See in Rome: Based on NeemTime research from most popular to just popular.

Trevi Fountain, Rome

Overview: The Trevi Fountain is a stunning Baroque masterpiece in Rome, known for its grandeur, intricate sculptures, and iconic water features.

History: Designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi in the 18th century, the Trevi Fountain stands as a symbol of Roman art and culture, depicting scenes from mythology and oceanic themes.

Since When: The Trevi Fountain has enchanted visitors since its completion in 1762.

Review: A mesmerizing sight, the Trevi Fountain captivates with its majestic design and the tradition of tossing a coin over the shoulder to ensure a return to Rome.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late evening to avoid crowds and experience the fountain’s enchanting beauty illuminated by lights.

How to Go: Accessible by metro or bus, with the nearest metro station being Barberini, followed by a short walk to the fountain.

What to Do: Marvel at the intricate sculptures, toss a coin into the fountain for luck, and indulge in gelato while soaking in the ambiance of the surrounding piazza.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and enjoy the fountain, but tossing a coin into the water is a traditional practice.

Colosseum, Rome

Overview: The Colosseum is an ancient amphitheater in Rome, renowned for its architectural grandeur, historical significance, and role in gladiatorial contests.

History: Built by the Roman Emperor Vespasian in AD 72-80, the Colosseum was a symbol of Roman power and entertainment, hosting spectacles such as gladiator battles and animal hunts.

Since When: The Colosseum has stood as an icon of Roman engineering and culture for over two millennia.

Review: A testament to the ingenuity of ancient Roman engineering, the Colosseum offers visitors a glimpse into the grandeur and brutality of Roman entertainment.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the crowds and enjoy the majestic structure in relative tranquility.

How to Go: Accessible by metro, bus, or on foot from various parts of Rome, with several entrances available for visitors.

What to Do: Explore the interior corridors and tiers, imagine the spectacles that once took place in the arena, and take in panoramic views of Rome from the upper levels.

Free or Paid: Paid entry to the Colosseum, with ticket prices varying based on age, nationality, and tour options.

Pantheon, Rome

Overview: The Pantheon is a magnificent ancient temple in Rome, revered for its architectural perfection, impressive dome, and artistic marvels.

History: Originally built by Emperor Augustus in 27 BC, the Pantheon was rebuilt in its current form by Emperor Hadrian in AD 118-128, serving as a temple dedicated to all the gods of ancient Rome.

Since When: The Pantheon has stood as a symbol of Roman engineering and religious devotion for over two millennia.

Review: A masterpiece of classical architecture, the Pantheon’s dome remains the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome and continues to inspire awe among visitors.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to experience the sunlight streaming through the oculus, illuminating the interior with a celestial glow.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transport, with several bus stops and metro stations located nearby.

What to Do: Admire the grandeur of the dome, marvel at the marble interior, and pay homage to the tomb of the Renaissance artist Raphael.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and explore the Pantheon’s interior.

Piazza Navona, Rome

Overview: Piazza Navona is a charming square in Rome, adorned with stunning Baroque architecture, elegant fountains, and vibrant street performers.

History: Originally built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian in the 1st century AD, Piazza Navona has evolved from a Roman arena to a bustling public square.

Since When: Piazza Navona has been a focal point of Roman life and culture for over 2,000 years.

Review: A lively hub of activity, Piazza Navona offers visitors a delightful blend of history, art, and entertainment, making it a must-visit destination in Rome.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the square’s beauty without the crowds, or in the evening for a vibrant atmosphere.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with bus stops and taxi stands nearby.

What to Do: Admire the fountains, browse the outdoor cafes and artisan shops, and soak in the lively ambiance of street performances and local artists.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and enjoy the square’s attractions.

Vatican Museums, Rome

Overview: The Vatican Museums house one of the world’s most extensive art collections, including masterpieces by Michelangelo, Raphael, and Leonardo da Vinci, within the Vatican City.

History: Founded by Pope Julius II in the early 16th century, the Vatican Museums have grown over the centuries to become a treasure trove of art and cultural heritage.

Since When: The Vatican Museums have been showcasing their impressive collection to the public since the 16th century.

Review: A journey through the Vatican Museums is a mesmerizing experience, offering unparalleled insights into the history, art, and culture of the Catholic Church and the world.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds, or consider booking a guided tour for exclusive access and insights.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, metro, or bus, with the Vatican Museums located near St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City.

What to Do: Explore the vast collection of artworks, marvel at the Sistine Chapel ceiling, and discover hidden gems in the museum’s galleries and corridors.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with ticket prices varying based on age, nationality, and tour options.

St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome

Overview: St. Peter’s Basilica is a magnificent Renaissance church in Vatican City, revered as one of the holiest Catholic shrines and a masterpiece of architecture.

History: Built atop the tomb of St. Peter, the first pope, St. Peter’s Basilica was constructed over several centuries by renowned architects and artists, including Michelangelo and Bernini.

Since When: St. Peter’s Basilica has stood as a symbol of faith and grandeur since its consecration in the 16th century.

Review: A marvel of art and architecture, St. Peter’s Basilica enchants visitors with its grandeur, ornate decorations, and sacred atmosphere, making it a spiritual and cultural highlight of Rome.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds and enjoy the tranquility of the basilica’s interior.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, metro, or bus, with the basilica located within Vatican City near the Vatican Museums.

What to Do: Admire the magnificent dome, marvel at Michelangelo’s Pieta and Bernini’s baldachin, and ascend to the top of the dome for panoramic views of Rome.

Free or Paid: Free to enter the basilica, but there may be fees for guided tours or access to certain areas.

Roman Forum, Rome

Overview: The Roman Forum is an ancient archaeological site in Rome, once the center of Roman public life, featuring ruins of temples, government buildings, and basilicas.

History: Dating back to the 7th century BC, the Roman Forum was the political, religious, and commercial heart of ancient Rome, witnessing centuries of history and monumental events.

Since When: The Roman Forum has been a symbol of Roman civilization for over 2,500 years.

Review: Exploring the Roman Forum is like stepping back in time, offering visitors a fascinating glimpse into the daily life and grandeur of ancient Rome amidst its impressive ruins.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid the heat and crowds, and consider a guided tour for deeper insights into the site’s history.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transport, with nearby metro stations and bus stops connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Wander through the ruins of ancient temples and basilicas, imagine the bustling marketplace and political debates that once took place here, and marvel at the panoramic views of the Colosseum and Palatine Hill.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for individual visits or combined with other nearby attractions such as the Colosseum.

Piazza del Popolo, Rome

Overview: Piazza del Popolo is a grand square in Rome, adorned with elegant fountains, obelisks, and impressive Baroque architecture, serving as a popular gathering spot for locals and tourists alike.

History: Originally a site for public executions and entertainment, Piazza del Popolo underwent Renaissance and Baroque transformations to become the picturesque square it is today.

Since When: Piazza del Popolo has been a prominent landmark in Rome since the 16th century.

Review: With its symmetrical design and stunning monuments, Piazza del Popolo offers visitors a peaceful oasis in the bustling city center, ideal for leisurely strolls and people-watching.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the square’s beauty without the crowds, or in the evening for a romantic ambiance with illuminated fountains.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, metro, or bus, with nearby metro stations and bus stops connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Admire the twin churches of Santa Maria del Popolo, take photos by the Fountain of the Lions, and enjoy panoramic views from the Pincian Hill overlooking the square.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and enjoy the square’s attractions.

Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome

Overview: Castel Sant’Angelo is a majestic fortress in Rome, originally built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian, later serving as a papal residence and prison, and now a museum showcasing its rich history.

History: Constructed in AD 135, Castel Sant’Angelo has witnessed centuries of history, from imperial tombs to papal intrigues, and played a crucial role in defending Rome during times of siege.

Since When: Castel Sant’Angelo has stood as a symbol of Roman resilience and architectural prowess for nearly 2,000 years.

Review: Exploring Castel Sant’Angelo offers visitors a fascinating journey through Rome’s past, from its origins as a mausoleum to its later use as a fortress and papal refuge, with stunning views of the city from its rooftop terrace.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds and heat, and consider a guided tour for insights into the castle’s history and architecture.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, metro, or bus, with nearby metro stations and bus stops connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Ascend to the rooftop terrace for panoramic views of Rome, explore the castle’s dungeons and papal apartments, and admire the intricate Renaissance decorations.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for individual visits or combined with other nearby attractions such as the Vatican Museums.

Villa Borghese, Rome

Overview: Villa Borghese is a vast public park in Rome, featuring lush gardens, iconic sculptures, and cultural institutions, offering a peaceful retreat from the city’s hustle and bustle.

History: Commissioned by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in the 17th century, Villa Borghese was originally a private estate, later transformed into a public park by the Borghese family.

Since When: Villa Borghese has been open to the public since the early 1900s, becoming one of Rome’s most beloved green spaces.

Review: Villa Borghese is a paradise for nature lovers and art enthusiasts alike, with its scenic beauty, diverse flora, and renowned museums showcasing masterpieces by Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael.

When to Go: Visit in the spring to see the gardens in full bloom, or in the fall to enjoy the vibrant foliage and cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram from various parts of Rome, with entrances located at Piazzale Flaminio, Pinciano, and Porta Pinciana.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the gardens, rent a rowboat on the lake, visit the Galleria Borghese to admire its art collection, and enjoy picnics amidst the greenery.

Free or Paid: Free entry to the park, but there may be fees for attractions such as the Galleria Borghese or bicycle rentals.

Sistine Chapel, Rome

Overview: The Sistine Chapel is a masterpiece of Renaissance art located within Vatican City, renowned for its ceiling painted by Michelangelo and its role as the site of papal conclaves.

History: Built in the late 15th century by Pope Sixtus IV, the Sistine Chapel has served as a place of worship, papal ceremonies, and artistic inspiration for centuries.

Since When: The Sistine Chapel has been a cultural and religious landmark since its completion in the late 15th century.

Review: A visit to the Sistine Chapel is a transcendent experience, with Michelangelo’s breathtaking frescoes and the chapel’s sacred ambiance leaving a lasting impression on visitors.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds, and consider booking a guided tour for deeper insights into the chapel’s art and history.

How to Go: Accessible by foot within Vatican City, with entrances located near St. Peter’s Basilica and the Vatican Museums.

What to Do: Marvel at Michelangelo’s ceiling frescoes, including the iconic depiction of the Creation of Adam, and admire the Last Judgment on the chapel’s altar wall.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, included as part of the Vatican Museums ticket.

Spanish Steps, Rome

Overview: The Spanish Steps is a grand staircase in Rome, adorned with elegant Baroque architecture, leading from the Piazza di Spagna to the Trinità dei Monti church.

History: Built in the early 18th century to connect the Spanish Embassy to the Holy See with the Trinità dei Monti church, the Spanish Steps have since become a beloved landmark and gathering place in Rome.

Since When: The Spanish Steps have been a popular meeting spot and tourist attraction since their completion in the 18th century.

Review: The Spanish Steps offer a charming spot for people-watching, relaxation, and enjoying the picturesque views of Rome’s historic center.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late evening to avoid the crowds, or during spring when the steps are adorned with vibrant azaleas.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, metro, or bus, with the Spagna metro station located nearby and several bus stops in the vicinity.

What to Do: Climb the steps to reach the Trinità dei Monti church for panoramic views, sit on the steps and soak in the atmosphere, and explore the boutiques and cafes in the surrounding area.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and enjoy the steps and surrounding area.

Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, Rome

Overview: The Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, also known as the Altare della Patria, is a grandiose neoclassical monument in Rome dedicated to the first king of unified Italy.

History: Constructed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to honor Victor Emmanuel II, the monument symbolizes Italy’s unification and commemorates the country’s struggle for independence.

Since When: The Monument to Victor Emmanuel II has stood as a national symbol since its inauguration in 1911.

Review: While divisive due to its imposing scale and controversial architectural style, the monument offers panoramic views of Rome and serves as a reminder of Italy’s storied history.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and enjoy the impressive views from the terrace.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with the monument located near the Piazza Venezia in the heart of Rome.

What to Do: Climb to the top for stunning vistas of Rome, explore the various sculptures and reliefs, and visit the Museum of Italian Reunification located within the monument.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the monument and terrace, but there may be fees for accessing the museum and exhibitions.

Campo de’ Fiori, Rome

Overview: Campo de’ Fiori is a bustling square in Rome, known for its vibrant outdoor market, lively atmosphere, and historic charm.

History: Dating back to the Middle Ages, Campo de’ Fiori has served as a market square, meeting place, and site of public executions, evolving into a vibrant hub of activity over the centuries.

Since When: Campo de’ Fiori has been a beloved gathering spot for locals and tourists alike for centuries.

Review: With its colorful stalls selling fresh produce, flowers, and souvenirs, Campo de’ Fiori offers a taste of authentic Roman life and is a great place to soak up the city’s atmosphere.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to experience the bustling market, or in the evening to enjoy drinks and live music at the square’s many bars and cafes.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and taxi stands for easy transportation.

What to Do: Explore the market stalls, sample fresh produce and local delicacies, and admire the statue of Giordano Bruno at the center of the square.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the square and market, with costs depending on purchases made.

Piazza Venezia, Rome

Overview: Piazza Venezia is a grand square in Rome, dominated by the imposing Monument to Victor Emmanuel II and surrounded by historic landmarks, including the Palazzo Venezia and the Trajan’s Column.

History: Originally the site of ancient Roman markets and political gatherings, Piazza Venezia has been a focal point of Roman life for centuries, witnessing key events in the city’s history.

Since When: Piazza Venezia has been a prominent landmark in Rome since antiquity, with its current layout dating back to the late 19th century.

Review: Offering a mix of architectural styles and historical significance, Piazza Venezia is a must-visit destination for history buffs and architecture enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and enjoy the square’s monumental beauty in relative tranquility.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with the Piazza Venezia serving as a major transportation hub in central Rome.

What to Do: Admire the grandeur of the Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, explore the Palazzo Venezia museum, and take in the views of the surrounding landmarks.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the square and monuments, but there may be fees for entering museums or attractions nearby.

Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome

Overview: Largo di Torre Argentina is a historic square in Rome, known for its ancient Roman ruins and as the site where Julius Caesar was assassinated.

History: Dating back to the Republican era, Largo di Torre Argentina contains the remains of four Roman temples and the famous Theatre of Pompey, where Caesar met his demise in 44 BC.

Since When: Largo di Torre Argentina has been a significant archaeological site since its rediscovery in the 1920s.

Review: Offering a fascinating glimpse into ancient Roman history amidst a bustling modern city, Largo di Torre Argentina is a must-visit for history enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and explore the ruins in a tranquil setting.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transport, with nearby bus stops and tram stations connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Wander among the ruins, observe the resident colony of stray cats, and visit the archaeological area to learn about the site’s historical significance.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the square and observe the ruins from street level, but there may be fees for accessing the archaeological area.

Parco della Mole Adriana, Rome

Overview: Parco della Mole Adriana, also known as the Park of the Adriano Mausoleum, is a tranquil park in Rome surrounding the towering Mausoleum of Hadrian.

History: Originally built by Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD as a tomb for himself and his family, the mausoleum later served various purposes, including as a fortress and papal residence.

Since When: Parco della Mole Adriana has been a public park since the early 20th century, offering visitors a peaceful retreat amidst ancient ruins.

Review: Offering a serene escape from the bustling city, Parco della Mole Adriana provides a picturesque setting for leisurely walks and contemplation.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to enjoy the park’s tranquility and admire the views of the Tiber River.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby tram stops and bus stations connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Stroll through the park’s lush greenery, explore the ruins of the mausoleum, and enjoy panoramic views of Rome from the park’s elevated vantage points.

Free or Paid: Free to enter and explore the park and mausoleum ruins.


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Palatine Hill, Rome

Overview: Palatine Hill is one of the seven hills of Rome, renowned for its ancient ruins, including the legendary birthplace of Rome’s founding twins, Romulus and Remus.

History: Considered the birthplace of Rome, Palatine Hill has been inhabited since the 10th century BC and became the site of palaces, temples, and imperial residences during the Roman Empire.

Since When: Palatine Hill has been a site of human habitation and historical significance for over three millennia.

Review: Offering panoramic views of the Roman Forum and Circus Maximus, Palatine Hill provides a fascinating journey through Rome’s legendary origins and imperial past.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the heat and crowds, and consider a guided tour for deeper insights into the site’s history.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from the Roman Forum or via the entrance near the Colosseum, with nearby metro stations and bus stops connecting to central Rome.

What to Do: Explore the ruins of imperial palaces, wander through lush gardens, and marvel at the ancient artifacts and panoramic vistas.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, included as part of a combined ticket with the Roman Forum and Colosseum.

Borghese Gallery and Museum, Rome

Overview: The Borghese Gallery and Museum is a renowned art museum in Rome, housing an impressive collection of sculptures, paintings, and antiquities within the stunning Villa Borghese.

History: Commissioned by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in the 17th century to showcase his vast art collection, the Borghese Gallery has since become a cultural treasure trove open to the public.

Since When: The Borghese Gallery and Museum has been welcoming visitors since the early 20th century.

Review: A masterpiece of art and architecture, the Borghese Gallery offers a captivating journey through the Baroque era with works by Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael, among others.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to enjoy the artworks with fewer crowds, and make sure to book tickets in advance to secure entry.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby tram stations and bus stops connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Admire Bernini’s masterpieces, such as “Apollo and Daphne” and “David,” marvel at Caravaggio’s dramatic paintings, and explore the exquisite collection of ancient Roman sculptures.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for timed entry slots and including access to the museum and its gardens.

Campidoglio, Rome

Overview: Campidoglio, or Capitoline Hill, is one of Rome’s seven hills and the historic center of the city, featuring Michelangelo’s iconic Piazza del Campidoglio and the Capitoline Museums.

History: Originally the political and religious center of ancient Rome, Campidoglio has been a site of power and governance for over two millennia, with the modern square and museums designed by Michelangelo in the 16th century.

Since When: Campidoglio has been a symbol of Roman authority and artistic excellence since Michelangelo’s redesign in the 16th century.

Review: Offering stunning Renaissance architecture, majestic statues, and panoramic views of the Roman Forum, Campidoglio is a must-visit destination for history and art lovers.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to enjoy the square’s beauty in the soft morning light and to avoid the midday heat.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and taxi stands for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Marvel at Michelangelo’s architectural masterpiece, explore the Capitoline Museums to see ancient artifacts and Renaissance artworks, and soak in the panoramic views of ancient Rome.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the square and enjoy the panoramic views, but there may be fees for accessing the museums and exhibitions.

Janiculum Hill, Rome

Overview: Janiculum Hill, also known as Gianicolo, offers panoramic views of Rome and is home to several landmarks, including the Fontana dell’Acqua Paola and the Janiculum Terrace.

History: A site of strategic importance in ancient Rome, Janiculum Hill has been fortified since ancient times and played a role in various historical events, including battles and sieges.

Since When: Janiculum Hill has been a popular destination for locals and tourists seeking panoramic views of Rome for centuries.

Review: Providing breathtaking vistas of Rome’s skyline and landmarks, Janiculum Hill is a perfect spot for a leisurely stroll or romantic sunset.

When to Go: Visit in the late afternoon to catch the sunset over the city, or at night for a magical view of Rome illuminated.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or taxi, with several staircases and pathways leading up to the hill from Trastevere and the Vatican.

What to Do: Enjoy a picnic in the park, take photos at the Fontana dell’Acqua Paola, and relax at the Janiculum Terrace while admiring the panoramic views.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and enjoy the views from the hilltop park.

St. Angelo Bridge, Rome

Overview: St. Angelo Bridge, also known as Ponte Sant’Angelo, is a historic bridge in Rome spanning the Tiber River, adorned with ten angel statues sculpted by Bernini and his students.

History: Built in the 2nd century AD by Emperor Hadrian, St. Angelo Bridge originally served as a passageway to his mausoleum, later adorned with angel statues during the Renaissance.

Since When: St. Angelo Bridge has been an iconic landmark in Rome for over two millennia, connecting the city center to the Vatican.

Review: Offering stunning views of the Tiber River and nearby landmarks, St. Angelo Bridge is a picturesque spot for a leisurely stroll or romantic evening walk.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or evening to enjoy the bridge’s beauty and avoid crowds.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and metro stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Admire the angel statues lining the bridge, take photos of the scenic views, and explore nearby attractions such as Castel Sant’Angelo.

Free or Paid: Free to walk across and enjoy the views from the bridge.

Galleria Borghese, Rome

Overview: The Galleria Borghese is an art gallery housed within the Villa Borghese in Rome, renowned for its collection of sculptures, paintings, and antiquities.

History: Commissioned by Cardinal Scipione Borghese in the 17th century to showcase his extensive art collection, the Galleria Borghese has since become a treasure trove of Baroque masterpieces.

Since When: The Galleria Borghese has been open to the public since the early 20th century, delighting visitors with its impressive artworks.

Review: With works by renowned artists such as Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael, the Galleria Borghese offers a captivating journey through the Baroque period in a breathtaking setting.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to enjoy the artworks with fewer crowds, and make sure to book tickets in advance to secure entry.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby tram stations and bus stops connecting to various parts of Rome.

What to Do: Marvel at Bernini’s masterpieces, such as “Apollo and Daphne” and “David,” admire Caravaggio’s dramatic paintings, and explore the exquisite collection of ancient Roman sculptures.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for timed entry slots and including access to the museum and its gardens.

Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere, Rome

Overview: The Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of Rome’s oldest churches, known for its stunning mosaics, Romanesque architecture, and vibrant atmosphere.

History: Founded in the 4th century AD, the Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere is said to stand on the site of an ancient spring where the Virgin Mary appeared, making it a sacred pilgrimage site.

Since When: The current basilica dates back to the 12th century, with later additions and renovations over the centuries.

Review: A hidden gem in Rome’s Trastevere neighborhood, the basilica’s intricate mosaics and serene ambiance make it a must-visit for history and art enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to experience the basilica’s quiet beauty and attend a morning mass for an authentic spiritual experience.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby tram stops and bus stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Admire the golden mosaics depicting scenes from the life of the Virgin Mary, explore the interior of the basilica, and attend a mass or religious service.

Free or Paid: Free to enter and explore the basilica, but donations are appreciated for its upkeep and maintenance.

Mouth of Truth, Rome

Overview: The Mouth of Truth, or Bocca della Verità, is a renowned marble mask located in the portico of the Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome, known for its legend of truth-telling.

History: Dating back to ancient Rome, the Mouth of Truth served as a cover for a drain in the Temple of Hercules Victor before being relocated to its current location in the Middle Ages.

Since When: The Mouth of Truth has been a popular attraction in Rome since medieval times, attracting visitors intrigued by its myth and mystery.

Review: A fascinating relic of Roman folklore, the Mouth of Truth is a fun and interactive experience for visitors seeking a unique photo opportunity and a chance to test their honesty.

When to Go: Visit during off-peak hours to avoid crowds and have ample time for photo opportunities with the Mouth of Truth.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and tram stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Place your hand in the Mouth of Truth’s mouth and tell the truth (or a harmless lie) for a memorable photo op, and explore the nearby Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and take photos with the Mouth of Truth.

Trastevere, Rome

Overview: Trastevere is a charming and picturesque neighborhood in Rome, known for its narrow cobblestone streets, vibrant nightlife, and authentic Roman atmosphere.

History: Trastevere has ancient origins, dating back to the time of ancient Rome, and has preserved its medieval character, with winding streets and historic churches.

Since When: Trastevere has been inhabited for over two millennia, evolving from a working-class district to a bohemian enclave popular with artists and expatriates.

Review: With its lively piazzas, quaint cafes, and artisan shops, Trastevere offers a delightful escape from the crowds of central Rome and provides a glimpse into authentic Roman life.

When to Go: Visit in the late afternoon or evening to experience Trastevere’s bustling nightlife and vibrant street scene.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from central Rome, with nearby tram stops and bus stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Wander through the narrow streets, dine at a traditional trattoria, sip wine in a cozy enoteca, and visit historic landmarks like the Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere.

Free or Paid: Free to explore the neighborhood, but costs may vary for dining and entertainment.

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome

Overview: The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is one of the four major basilicas in Rome, known for its magnificent architecture, rich history, and stunning interior decorations.

History: Founded in the 4th century AD, the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is one of Rome’s oldest churches, built following a miraculous snowfall in August.

Since When: The current basilica dates back to the 5th century, with later additions and renovations over the centuries.

Review: A masterpiece of Romanesque and Baroque architecture, the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore boasts breathtaking mosaics, intricate frescoes, and a tranquil atmosphere.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and attend a mass for a serene spiritual experience amidst the basilica’s stunning artwork.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby tram stops and bus stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Marvel at the basilica’s golden mosaics depicting biblical scenes, explore the underground Crypt of the Nativity, and admire the stunning Borghese Chapel.

Free or Paid: Free to enter and explore the basilica, but donations are appreciated for its upkeep and maintenance.

Capitoline Museums, Rome

Overview: The Capitoline Museums house a rich collection of ancient Roman sculptures, Renaissance art, and archaeological artifacts, located atop Capitoline Hill in Rome.

History: Established in 1471 by Pope Sixtus IV, the Capitoline Museums are the world’s oldest public museum and were designed to showcase ancient Roman art and culture.

Since When: The Capitoline Museums have been open to the public since the Renaissance era, making them a cornerstone of Rome’s cultural heritage.

Review: With masterpieces like the Capitoline Wolf and the Dying Gaul, the Capitoline Museums offer a captivating journey through the art and history of Rome.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and have ample time to explore the extensive collection at a leisurely pace.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby tram stops and bus stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Admire iconic sculptures and artworks, explore the museum’s many galleries and exhibitions, and enjoy panoramic views of Rome from the Capitoline Hill.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for access to the museum’s permanent collections and special exhibitions.

Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome

Overview: The Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo is a museum housed within the historic Castel Sant’Angelo, showcasing its rich history as a mausoleum, fortress, and papal residence.

History: Originally built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, Castel Sant’Angelo has served various purposes over the centuries, including as a fortress and prison.

Since When: The Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo has been open to the public since the 20th century, offering visitors a glimpse into the castle’s storied past.

Review: Offering panoramic views of Rome’s skyline and exhibitions on its fascinating history, the Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo is a must-visit for history enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and explore the museum’s collections and exhibitions at a leisurely pace.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from central Rome, with nearby bus stops and taxi stands for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Explore the castle’s medieval ramparts, visit the papal apartments, and enjoy the museum’s collection of Renaissance paintings and artifacts.

Free or Paid: Paid entry, with tickets available for access to the museum’s exhibitions and guided tours of the castle.

Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome

Overview: The Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli is a historic church in Rome known for housing Michelangelo’s famous sculpture of Moses.

History: Originally built in the 5th century to house the chains that bound St. Peter, the basilica was later rebuilt in the 15th century by Pope Sixtus IV.

Since When: The current basilica has stood since the 15th century, serving as a pilgrimage site and a place of worship for centuries.

Review: With its stunning architecture and impressive art collection, the Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli offers visitors a peaceful retreat from the bustling streets of Rome.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to enjoy the basilica’s serene atmosphere and avoid crowds.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with nearby bus stops and tram stations for convenient access.

What to Do: Marvel at Michelangelo’s Moses sculpture, admire the intricate mosaics and frescoes, and explore the basilica’s quiet courtyard.

Free or Paid: Free to enter and explore.

Ponte Sisto, Rome

Overview: Ponte Sisto is a picturesque pedestrian bridge spanning the Tiber River in Rome, offering stunning views of the city’s historic landmarks.

History: Built in the late 15th century by Pope Sixtus IV, Ponte Sisto is one of the oldest bridges in Rome, connecting the Trastevere and historic city center.

Since When: Ponte Sisto has been an iconic feature of Rome’s skyline since its completion in 1479.

Review: With its elegant design and romantic atmosphere, Ponte Sisto is the perfect spot for a leisurely stroll or to capture breathtaking views of the Tiber River and surrounding architecture.

When to Go: Visit during the golden hour in the evening for magical views of Rome’s illuminated skyline.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and tram stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Take a leisurely walk across the bridge, enjoy views of nearby landmarks such as Palazzo Farnese, and explore the charming Trastevere neighborhood.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and walk across.

Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II, Rome

Overview: The Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II, also known as the Altare della Patria or the Vittoriano, is a grandiose monument honoring the first king of unified Italy.

History: Constructed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II was built to commemorate Italy’s unification and honor King Vittorio Emanuele II.

Since When: The monument was inaugurated in 1911 and has since become a symbol of Italian nationalism and unity.

Review: While divisive among locals for its imposing presence, the Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II offers panoramic views of Rome from its terrace and houses the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning to avoid crowds and have a peaceful experience exploring the monument and its surroundings.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with nearby bus stops and metro stations for convenient access.

What to Do: Ascend to the terrace for panoramic views of Rome, admire the grandiose architecture and sculptures, and pay respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Free or Paid: Free to visit the exterior, but there may be fees for accessing the terrace and exhibitions inside.

LivTours, Rome

Overview: LivTours offers guided tours and experiences in Rome, providing travelers with immersive and educational insights into the city’s rich history and culture.

History: Founded by passionate locals and expert guides, LivTours aims to provide travelers with authentic and memorable experiences in Rome’s most iconic landmarks and hidden gems.

Since When: LivTours has been operating in Rome for several years, earning a reputation for excellence and professionalism in guided tours and experiences.

Review: With knowledgeable guides and small-group tours, LivTours offers a personalized and insightful way to explore Rome’s landmarks, museums, and neighborhoods.

When to Go: Tours are available year-round, with options for morning, afternoon, and evening excursions to suit every traveler’s schedule.

How to Go: Book online through the LivTours website or contact their customer service team to reserve a spot on your desired tour.

What to Do: Join a guided tour to explore Rome’s highlights such as the Vatican Museums, Colosseum, and Trevi Fountain, or opt for a food tour to sample authentic Italian cuisine.

Free or Paid: Paid, with prices varying depending on the selected tour or experience.

Fiumi Fountain, Rome

Overview: The Fiumi Fountain, also known as Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi, is a stunning Baroque fountain located in the heart of Rome’s Piazza Navona.

History: Designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in the 17th century, the Fiumi Fountain represents the four major rivers of the world, embodying the power and majesty of nature.

Since When: The Fiumi Fountain has been a centerpiece of Piazza Navona since its completion in 1651.

Review: With its intricate sculptures and dramatic design, the Fiumi Fountain is a masterpiece of Baroque art and a must-see attraction in Rome.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late in the evening to avoid crowds and fully appreciate the fountain’s beauty.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from various parts of central Rome, with nearby bus stops and tram stations for convenient transportation.

What to Do: Marvel at the fountain’s elaborate sculptures, toss a coin into the water for good luck, and soak in the vibrant atmosphere of Piazza Navona.

Free or Paid: Free to visit and admire.


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