What to do in Paris

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What to do in Paris

What to do in Paris: Based on NeemTime research from most popular to just popular.

Eiffel Tower, Paris

Overview: The Eiffel Tower, an iconic symbol of Paris, is a wrought-iron lattice tower offering breathtaking views of the city’s skyline and landmarks from its observation decks.

History: Designed by Gustave Eiffel for the 1889 World’s Fair, the Eiffel Tower was initially criticized but has since become one of the most recognizable structures in the world.

Since When: The Eiffel Tower has been an iconic landmark in Paris since its completion in 1889.

Review: The Eiffel Tower is praised for its stunning architecture, panoramic views, and romantic ambiance, making it a must-visit attraction for tourists and locals alike.

When to Go: The best time to visit the Eiffel Tower is early morning or late evening to avoid crowds and enjoy spectacular sunrise or sunset views.

How to Go: Visitors can reach the Eiffel Tower by metro, bus, or on foot, with several entrances and ticket options available for accessing the observation decks.

What to Do: Visitors can admire the tower’s intricate design, ascend to the observation decks for panoramic views of Paris, and enjoy dining at one of its restaurants.

Free or Paid: While there is a fee to access the Eiffel Tower’s observation decks, visitors can still enjoy views of the tower for free from various vantage points across Paris.

Louvre Museum, Paris

Overview: The Louvre Museum is a world-renowned art museum located in Paris, France, housing thousands of works including the iconic Mona Lisa.

History: Originally built as a fortress in the late 12th century, the Louvre was transformed into a royal palace in the 16th century before becoming a museum during the French Revolution.

Since when: The Louvre officially opened as a museum in 1793.

Review: A treasure trove of art and history, the Louvre offers an unparalleled experience for art enthusiasts and history buffs alike.

When to go: To avoid crowds, consider visiting early in the morning or during the quieter seasons of late autumn or winter.

How to go: Easily accessible by public transportation, visitors can take the metro to the Palais Royal–Musée du Louvre station or utilize nearby bus routes.

What to do: Explore iconic masterpieces such as the Venus de Milo and Winged Victory of Samothrace, as well as temporary exhibitions showcasing diverse art forms.

Free or Paid: Entry to the Louvre is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students and seniors. However, admission is free on the first Saturday night of each month.

Arc de Triomphe, Paris

Overview: The Arc de Triomphe is a monumental triumphal arch located at the western end of the Champs-Élysées, serving as a symbol of French patriotism and military victories.

History: Commissioned by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1806 to commemorate French military successes, the Arc was completed in 1836.

Since when: The Arc de Triomphe was completed in 1836 and has since become an enduring symbol of France.

Review: Offering panoramic views of Paris from its observation deck and housing the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, the Arc de Triomphe is a must-visit landmark.

When to go: Sunset provides a stunning backdrop for photographs, and the illumination of the city at night from the top of the Arc is breathtaking.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can disembark at the Charles de Gaulle–Étoile station and walk along the Avenue des Champs-Élysées to reach the monument.

What to do: Ascend to the top for unparalleled views of Paris, and pay respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier beneath the arch.

Free or Paid: Entry to the Arc de Triomphe is paid, with discounts available for youth, students, and seniors. However, entry is free on the first Sunday of each month from November to March.

Trocadéro Gardens, Paris

Overview: Trocadéro Gardens, located across from the Eiffel Tower, offer stunning views of the iconic landmark and serve as a popular gathering spot for locals and tourists alike.

History: The gardens were created for the International Exposition of 1937, replacing the old Palais du Trocadéro.

Since when: Trocadéro Gardens have been a beloved Parisian destination since their creation for the 1937 International Exposition.

Review: With its expansive green spaces, fountains, and prime view of the Eiffel Tower, Trocadéro Gardens provide an ideal setting for relaxation and sightseeing.

When to go: Visit during the early morning or late evening to avoid crowds and enjoy the tranquil ambiance.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 9 and disembark at the Trocadéro station, which provides easy access to the gardens.

What to do: Relax amidst the lush greenery, take in panoramic views of the Eiffel Tower, and capture memorable photos of one of Paris’s most iconic landmarks.

Free or Paid: Entry to Trocadéro Gardens is free, making it an accessible destination for all visitors to enjoy.

Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris

Overview: Jardin du Luxembourg, or Luxembourg Gardens, is a picturesque public park known for its manicured lawns, statues, and the Luxembourg Palace.

History: Originally created in the early 17th century at the behest of Queen Marie de’ Medici, the gardens have since become a beloved Parisian retreat.

Since when: Jardin du Luxembourg has been enchanting visitors since its creation in the early 17th century.

Review: Offering a tranquil escape from the bustling city, Jardin du Luxembourg is perfect for leisurely strolls, picnics, and admiring its ornate fountains and flowerbeds.

When to go: Spring and summer offer the best weather for enjoying the gardens’ beauty, though autumn also provides a colorful backdrop.

How to go: Easily accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 4 and disembark at the Odéon or Saint-Sulpice stations, both within walking distance of the gardens.

What to do: Explore the sprawling grounds, admire the statues and fountains, rent a sailboat for the pond, or simply relax and people-watch.

Free or Paid: Entry to Jardin du Luxembourg is free, making it an accessible and delightful destination for all to enjoy.

Tuileries Garden, Paris

Overview: Tuileries Garden is a historic public park located between the Louvre Museum and Place de la Concorde, renowned for its formal design and art installations.

History: Originally created in the 16th century by Catherine de’ Medici, the gardens were redesigned in the 17th century by André Le Nôtre, and have since become a popular destination for both locals and tourists.

Since when: Tuileries Garden has captivated visitors since its creation in the 16th century, undergoing various transformations over the centuries.

Review: With its impeccable landscaping, striking sculptures, and proximity to major landmarks, Tuileries Garden offers a serene oasis in the heart of Paris.

When to go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and enjoy the peaceful ambiance of the gardens.

How to go: Conveniently located, visitors can walk from nearby attractions such as the Louvre Museum or take the metro to the Tuileries station.

What to do: Wander through the geometrically laid-out pathways, admire the sculptures, relax by the fountains, or simply soak in the beauty of this historic green space.

Free or Paid: Entry to Tuileries Garden is free, making it an accessible destination for visitors to unwind and appreciate its beauty.

Musée d’Orsay, Paris

Overview: Housed in a former railway station, the Musée d’Orsay is renowned for its extensive collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterpieces.

History: The museum opened its doors in 1986, showcasing artworks primarily dating from 1848 to 1914, including iconic pieces by artists such as Monet, Van Gogh, and Renoir.

Since when: The Musée d’Orsay has been captivating art lovers since its opening in 1986, quickly becoming one of Paris’s most visited museums.

Review: Offering a more intimate and manageable experience compared to the Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay’s collection and setting make it a must-visit for art aficionados.

When to go: To avoid crowds, consider visiting on weekdays, particularly in the morning or late afternoon.

How to go: Easily accessible by public transportation, visitors can take the RER C train to the Musée d’Orsay station or utilize nearby metro and bus routes.

What to do: Marvel at masterpieces by Monet, Degas, and other luminaries of the art world, and explore the museum’s diverse collection spanning painting, sculpture, photography, and decorative arts.

Free or Paid: Entry to the Musée d’Orsay is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students and seniors. However, entry is free on the first Sunday of each month.

Louvre Pyramid, Paris

Overview: The Louvre Pyramid is a striking glass and metal pyramid situated in the courtyard of the Louvre Museum, serving as the main entrance to the iconic institution.

History: Designed by architect I. M. Pei, the Louvre Pyramid was completed in 1989 as part of a renovation project aimed at modernizing the museum’s entrance and visitor experience.

Since when: The Louvre Pyramid has been an architectural marvel since its completion in 1989, instantly becoming a symbol of the Louvre Museum and Paris itself.

Review: Combining modern aesthetics with historical grandeur, the Louvre Pyramid is a captivating sight, both day and night, adding a contemporary touch to the museum’s classical surroundings.

When to go: Visit early in the morning to capture stunning photographs with fewer crowds or during the evening when the pyramid is beautifully illuminated.

How to go: Easily accessible within the Louvre courtyard, visitors can reach the Louvre Pyramid by entering the museum complex from the Rue de Rivoli or the Carrousel du Louvre underground shopping mall.

What to do: Admire the pyramid’s architectural brilliance, take photos against its striking backdrop, and explore the world-class art collections housed within the Louvre Museum.

Free or Paid: Viewing the Louvre Pyramid from outside is free; however, entry to the Louvre Museum itself requires a ticket, with various pricing options available.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, Paris

Overview: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, or Notre-Dame Cathedral, is a Gothic masterpiece located on the Île de la Cité, known for its stunning architecture, intricate sculptures, and iconic gargoyles.

History: Construction of Notre-Dame began in 1163 and continued over centuries, with various architects and craftsmen contributing to its design and embellishments.

Since when: Notre-Dame Cathedral has been a symbol of Parisian heritage and religious devotion since its completion in the 14th century.

Review: Despite the devastating fire in 2019, Notre-Dame remains a symbol of resilience and architectural splendor, with ongoing restoration efforts ensuring its eventual return to glory.

When to go: While Notre-Dame is currently closed for renovations, visitors can still appreciate its exterior beauty and intricate details from the surrounding square.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 4 and disembark at the Cité station, which is a short walk from the cathedral.

What to do: Marvel at the intricate façade adorned with sculptures, take a leisurely stroll along the Seine River, and explore the nearby Île Saint-Louis for charming cafes and boutiques.

Free or Paid: Viewing the exterior of Notre-Dame Cathedral is free, but entry to the cathedral’s interior, when it reopens, may require a donation or admission fee.

La Villette, Paris

Overview: La Villette is a sprawling cultural complex located in northeastern Paris, featuring museums, concert halls, green spaces, and the futuristic-looking Geode cinema.

History: Developed on the site of former slaughterhouses, La Villette was transformed into a cultural hub in the 1980s, offering a diverse array of artistic and recreational activities.

Since when: La Villette has been enriching Paris’s cultural landscape since its transformation into a cultural complex in the 1980s.

Review: With its innovative architecture, vibrant events, and expansive parkland, La Villette offers something for everyone, from art enthusiasts to families seeking outdoor recreation.

When to go: Visit during the summer months to enjoy outdoor concerts, film screenings, and picnics in the park, or explore indoor attractions during colder seasons.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 5 and disembark at the Porte de Pantin or Porte de la Villette stations, both of which provide easy access to the complex.

What to do: Explore the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie, catch a performance at the Grande Halle, stroll along the Canal de l’Ourcq, or simply relax in one of the many green spaces.

Free or Paid: Entry to La Villette’s outdoor spaces and parkland is free, but individual attractions within the complex may have admission fees.

Place de la Concorde, Paris

Overview: Place de la Concorde is one of the largest public squares in Paris, featuring an iconic central fountain, ornate lampposts, and historic statues.

History: Originally named Place Louis XV, it was redesigned during the French Revolution and later renamed Place de la Concorde as a symbol of reconciliation.

Since when: Place de la Concorde has graced the Parisian landscape since its redesign in the late 18th century.

Review: With its grandeur, historical significance, and central location between the Champs-Élysées and the Tuileries Garden, Place de la Concorde is a must-see attraction in Paris.

When to go: Visit during the evening to witness the square’s majestic lighting, or during the day to appreciate its architectural beauty and surrounding landmarks.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Concorde station, which is located directly adjacent to the square.

What to do: Admire the iconic Luxor Obelisk, stroll along the wide avenues, take in panoramic views of the city, and snap photos of the impressive fountains and sculptures.

Free or Paid: Entry to Place de la Concorde is free for all visitors to enjoy.

Palais Garnier, Paris

Overview: Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra Garnier, is a magnificent opera house known for its opulent Beaux-Arts architecture and lavish interiors.

History: Commissioned by Napoleon III, the Palais Garnier was inaugurated in 1875 and quickly became a symbol of Parisian cultural prestige and grandeur.

Since when: Palais Garnier has been enchanting audiences and visitors since its grand opening in 1875.

Review: With its breathtaking Grand Staircase, ornate chandeliers, and stunning auditorium, Palais Garnier offers a glimpse into the luxurious world of 19th-century Parisian society.

When to go: Attend a performance to fully experience the opulence and acoustics of the opera house, or take a guided tour during quieter times to admire its architectural details.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 3, 7, or 8 and disembark at the Opéra station, located just steps away from Palais Garnier.

What to do: Attend a world-class opera or ballet performance, take a guided tour to learn about its history and architecture, or simply admire the grandeur of its public spaces.

Free or Paid: Entry to Palais Garnier for performances requires purchasing tickets, while guided tours are available for a fee.

Sainte-Chapelle, Paris

Overview: Sainte-Chapelle is a stunning Gothic chapel renowned for its exquisite stained glass windows depicting biblical scenes and intricate architectural details.

History: Built in the 13th century by King Louis IX to house religious relics, Sainte-Chapelle served as a symbol of royal power and piety during the medieval period.

Since when: Sainte-Chapelle has been captivating visitors with its beauty and historical significance since its completion in 1248.

Review: A masterpiece of Gothic architecture, Sainte-Chapelle’s radiant stained glass windows and soaring ceilings create a transcendent atmosphere for contemplation and awe.

When to go: Visit during the morning to experience the chapel’s stained glass windows illuminated by natural light, enhancing their ethereal beauty.

How to go: Located on the Île de la Cité, visitors can easily reach Sainte-Chapelle by metro, taking Line 4 and disembarking at the Cité station.

What to do: Marvel at the intricate stained glass windows, admire the sculpted details of the interior, and attend a classical music concert to experience the chapel’s acoustics.

Free or Paid: Entry to Sainte-Chapelle requires purchasing tickets, with discounts available for students, seniors, and visitors under 26.

Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre, Paris

Overview: The Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre, or Sacré-Cœur Basilica, is a majestic Roman Catholic church perched atop the Montmartre hill, offering panoramic views of Paris.

History: Constructed in the late 19th century as a symbol of national penance following the Franco-Prussian War, the Sacré-Cœur Basilica showcases Romano-Byzantine architectural style.

Since when: The Sacré-Cœur Basilica has graced the Parisian skyline since its consecration in 1919, becoming a cherished landmark and place of worship.

Review: With its gleaming white façade, domed roof, and serene interior, Sacré-Cœur Basilica provides a peaceful retreat and stunning vistas of Paris, making it a must-visit destination.

When to go: Visit early in the morning to enjoy the tranquility of the basilica and the breathtaking sunrise views over Paris.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 2 and disembark at the Anvers station, followed by a scenic walk uphill to the basilica.

What to do: Admire the basilica’s architecture, enjoy panoramic views of Paris from the esplanade, explore the charming Montmartre neighborhood, and visit nearby artists’ studios and cafés.

Free or Paid: Entry to the Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre is free, although there may be fees for certain areas such as the dome climb.

Luxembourg Gardens, Paris

Overview: Luxembourg Gardens, or Jardin du Luxembourg, is a delightful public park in the heart of Paris, known for its lush greenery, statues, fountains, and serene atmosphere.

History: Created in the early 17th century by Queen Marie de’ Medici as part of the Luxembourg Palace, the gardens have since become a beloved oasis for relaxation and recreation.

Since when: Luxembourg Gardens has enchanted visitors since its inauguration in the early 17th century, offering a tranquil escape from the city’s hustle and bustle.

Review: With its manicured lawns, flowerbeds, and tree-lined promenades, Luxembourg Gardens provides a picturesque setting for leisurely strolls, picnics, and enjoying the beauty of nature.

When to go: Spring and summer offer the best weather for exploring the gardens, when the flowers are in bloom and the foliage is lush.

How to go: Easily accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 4 and disembark at the Odéon or Saint-Sulpice stations, both of which are within walking distance of the gardens.

What to do: Relax amidst the greenery, admire the statues and fountains, rent a sailboat for the pond, or simply enjoy a leisurely stroll while taking in the scenic beauty.

Free or Paid: Entry to Luxembourg Gardens is free for all visitors to enjoy.

Pont Alexandre III, Paris

Overview: Pont Alexandre III is an ornate bridge spanning the Seine River, renowned for its Beaux-Arts architecture, gilded sculptures, and breathtaking views of Paris landmarks.

History: Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, Pont Alexandre III is named after Tsar Alexander III of Russia, symbolizing the Franco-Russian alliance.

Since when: Pont Alexandre III has graced the Parisian skyline since its inauguration in 1900, serving as a majestic symbol of friendship between nations.

Review: With its elegant design, intricate detailing, and picturesque setting, Pont Alexandre III offers a romantic and photogenic backdrop for leisurely walks and sightseeing.

When to go: Visit during the golden hour before sunset to capture stunning photographs of the bridge and the surrounding landmarks bathed in warm light.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 8 and disembark at the Invalides station, which is a short walk from the bridge.

What to do: Admire the ornate lampposts, gilded sculptures, and sweeping views of the Seine River and nearby landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and Les Invalides.

Free or Paid: Access to Pont Alexandre III is free for pedestrians, offering a picturesque spot for sightseeing and photography.

Place des Vosges, Paris

Overview: Place des Vosges is a historic square in the Marais district, characterized by its elegant arcades, red-brick facades, and symmetrical layout.

History: Originally known as Place Royale, it was constructed in the early 17th century by Henri IV, making it one of the oldest planned squares in Paris.

Since when: Place des Vosges has graced the Parisian landscape since its completion in 1612, maintaining its charm and architectural significance over the centuries.

Review: With its timeless beauty, tranquil atmosphere, and surrounding boutiques and cafés, Place des Vosges offers a serene retreat in the heart of the bustling city.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays or early mornings to enjoy the square’s peaceful ambiance and admire the architecture without the crowds.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Saint-Paul station, which is a short walk from Place des Vosges.

What to do: Take a leisurely stroll around the square, admire the symmetrical architecture, relax on one of the benches, and explore the nearby art galleries and shops.

Free or Paid: Entry to Place des Vosges is free for all visitors to enjoy its architectural splendor and tranquil surroundings.

Seine River, Paris

Overview: The Seine River is the iconic waterway that flows through the heart of Paris, dividing the city into the Left Bank and the Right Bank, and offering scenic views of its famous landmarks.


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History: The Seine has been integral to the development of Paris since ancient times, serving as a vital trade route, source of livelihood, and inspiration for artists and writers.

Since when: The Seine River has been a defining feature of Parisian life since the city’s founding, shaping its culture, economy, and urban landscape.

Review: Whether you’re taking a leisurely cruise, enjoying a riverside picnic, or simply strolling along its banks, the Seine River offers a picturesque backdrop for exploring Paris.

When to go: Any time of year is suitable for enjoying the Seine, but spring and summer provide the best weather for outdoor activities and boat tours.

How to go: Accessible from various points across the city, visitors can easily reach the Seine by walking, cycling, or taking a boat tour from one of the many docks along its banks.

What to do: Take a romantic boat cruise, enjoy a picnic along the riverbanks, stroll across one of its historic bridges, or simply relax and watch the world go by.

Free or Paid: Enjoying the Seine River from its banks is free for all, while boat cruises and activities may have varying costs.

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont, Paris

Overview: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is a picturesque park in northeastern Paris, known for its rugged landscape, towering cliffs, and scenic views.

History: Created in the mid-19th century under Emperor Napoleon III, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont was designed to provide green space for the working-class residents of Paris.

Since when: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont has been delighting visitors since its inauguration in 1867, offering a tranquil escape from the city’s hustle and bustle.

Review: With its winding paths, dramatic waterfalls, and hidden grottos, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is a hidden gem that offers a sense of wilderness within the city.

When to go: Visit during the spring to see the park in full bloom, or during the autumn when the foliage turns vibrant shades of red and gold.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 7 bis and disembark at the Buttes-Chaumont station, which is located near the park’s entrance.

What to do: Take a leisurely stroll through the park, enjoy a picnic by the lake, climb to the top of the Belvedere for panoramic views of Paris, or relax in one of the many scenic spots.

Free or Paid: Entry to Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is free for all visitors to enjoy its natural beauty and recreational amenities.

Champs-Élysées, Paris

Overview: The Champs-Élysées is one of the most famous avenues in the world, lined with theaters, cafés, luxury boutiques, and historic landmarks.

History: Originally laid out in the 17th century as an extension of the Tuileries Garden, the Champs-Élysées evolved from a grand promenade to a symbol of Parisian elegance and prestige.

Since when: The Champs-Élysées has been a focal point of Parisian life and culture since its completion in the early 18th century.

Review: With its vibrant atmosphere, iconic architecture, and prestigious shops, the Champs-Élysées offers a quintessential Parisian experience for visitors and locals alike.

When to go: Visit during the holiday season to see the avenue adorned with festive decorations and lights, or early in the morning for a quieter stroll.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Champs-Élysées–Clemenceau station, or Line 2 and disembark at the Étoile station.

What to do: Explore the boutiques, enjoy a leisurely walk along the tree-lined avenue, stop for coffee or a meal at one of the many cafés, and visit iconic landmarks such as the Arc de Triomphe.

Free or Paid: Walking along the Champs-Élysées is free, but visiting attractions or shopping at the boutiques may incur costs.

Montmartre, Paris

Overview: Montmartre is a historic hilltop neighborhood known for its bohemian atmosphere, cobblestone streets, charming cafés, and the iconic Sacré-Cœur Basilica.

History: Once a rural village outside Paris, Montmartre became a center of art and culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, attracting artists like Picasso and Van Gogh.

Since when: Montmartre has been a hub of creativity and inspiration since the Belle Époque, shaping Paris’s artistic identity for generations.

Review: With its winding streets, bustling squares, and panoramic views of the city, Montmartre offers a delightful blend of history, culture, and charm.

When to go: Visit in the early morning to experience the neighborhood’s tranquil ambiance or in the evening to enjoy live music and vibrant nightlife.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 12 and disembark at the Abbesses or Lamarck–Caulaincourt stations, both of which provide access to Montmartre.

What to do: Explore the artistic heritage of Montmartre, visit the Sacré-Cœur Basilica, stroll through the Place du Tertre to see local artists at work, and enjoy panoramic views from the hilltop.

Free or Paid: Exploring Montmartre’s streets and squares is free, but visiting attractions or dining at cafés may involve costs.

Domaine National du Palais-Royal, Paris

Overview: Domaine National du Palais-Royal is a historic complex in the heart of Paris, comprising the Palais-Royal palace, beautiful gardens, art galleries, and boutiques.

History: Originally built as a royal palace in the 17th century, the Palais-Royal became a center of culture and entertainment during the French Revolution, and later a symbol of French monarchy.

Since when: The Domaine National du Palais-Royal has been a cultural landmark of Paris since its establishment as a public space in the late 18th century.

Review: With its elegant architecture, serene gardens, and cultural attractions, the Palais-Royal complex offers a peaceful retreat from the city’s hustle and bustle.

When to go: Visit during the spring or summer to enjoy the blooming flowers and outdoor cafés, or during the autumn to see the changing colors of the foliage.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 or Line 7 and disembark at the Palais Royal–Musée du Louvre station, which is located near the complex.

What to do: Explore the gardens, visit art galleries such as the Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, browse boutiques in the arcades, and admire the architecture of the Palais-Royal palace.

Free or Paid: Entry to the gardens and arcades of the Palais-Royal complex is free for all visitors to enjoy, while some attractions or activities may require payment.

Pont Neuf, Paris

Overview: Pont Neuf, meaning “New Bridge,” is the oldest standing bridge across the Seine River in Paris, known for its iconic design and panoramic views.

History: Construction began in 1578 under the reign of Henry III, with the bridge eventually completed in 1607, making it a historic symbol of Parisian architecture.

Since when: Pont Neuf has spanned the Seine River since its completion in 1607, remaining a beloved landmark and crossing point for centuries.

Review: Offering stunning views of the river and surrounding landmarks, Pont Neuf is a favorite spot for leisurely walks and romantic moments in the heart of Paris.

When to go: Visit during the evening to see the bridge illuminated against the night sky, or during the day for a picturesque stroll along the riverbanks.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 7 and disembark at the Pont Neuf station, or simply walk from nearby attractions in central Paris.

What to do: Take a leisurely walk across the bridge, enjoy views of the Seine River and Île de la Cité, and explore the surrounding area for charming cafes and shops.

Free or Paid: Walking across Pont Neuf is free for all to enjoy its architectural beauty and scenic views.

Petit Palais, Paris

Overview: Petit Palais, or the Small Palace, is a stunning Beaux-Arts style building in Paris, housing the City of Paris Museum of Fine Arts.

History: Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, Petit Palais was designed to showcase French art and craftsmanship, reflecting the cultural aspirations of the Belle Époque era.

Since when: Petit Palais has been open to the public as a museum since 1902, offering a rich collection of artworks spanning centuries and styles.

Review: With its impressive architecture, diverse collections, and serene courtyard garden, Petit Palais is a hidden gem for art enthusiasts seeking a quieter museum experience in Paris.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays to avoid crowds, or during temporary exhibitions to see unique artworks and installations.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Champs-Élysées–Clemenceau station, which is a short walk from Petit Palais.

What to do: Admire the museum’s architectural details, explore its permanent and temporary exhibitions, relax in the tranquil garden, and enjoy a coffee in the on-site café.

Free or Paid: Entry to Petit Palais and its permanent collections is free for all visitors, while some temporary exhibitions may require tickets for entry.

Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris

Overview: Musée de l’Orangerie is an art museum in Paris located in the Tuileries Garden, renowned for its collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterpieces, particularly Claude Monet’s Water Lilies series.

History: Originally built in the 19th century to house orange trees during winter, Musée de l’Orangerie was converted into an art museum in the 1920s to showcase Monet’s Water Lilies and other works.

Since when: Musée de l’Orangerie has been open to the public as an art museum since 1927, attracting visitors from around the world to marvel at its breathtaking collection.

Review: With its intimate setting and immersive displays of Monet’s Water Lilies, Musée de l’Orangerie offers a tranquil and enchanting experience for art lovers.

When to go: Visit during the morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and fully immerse yourself in the serenity of Monet’s iconic paintings.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Concorde station, which is a short walk from Musée de l’Orangerie.

What to do: Marvel at Monet’s Water Lilies in the specially designed oval rooms, explore the museum’s other collections of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art, and take a leisurely stroll through the Tuileries Garden.

Free or Paid: Entry to Musée de l’Orangerie is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students, seniors, and visitors under 26.

Musée Rodin, Paris

Overview: Musée Rodin is a museum dedicated to the works of French sculptor Auguste Rodin, showcasing his famous sculptures such as “The Thinker” and “The Kiss” in a charming mansion and garden setting.

History: The museum is housed in the Hôtel Biron, a grand 18th-century mansion where Rodin once lived and worked, and was established in 1919, two years after the sculptor’s death.

Since when: Musée Rodin has been captivating visitors with its collection of Rodin’s masterpieces since its opening in 1919.

Review: With its intimate setting and serene garden filled with sculptures, Musée Rodin offers a unique and immersive experience for art enthusiasts.

When to go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the museum and garden in a quieter atmosphere.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 13 and disembark at the Varenne station, which is a short walk from Musée Rodin.

What to do: Admire Rodin’s sculptures both indoors and outdoors, stroll through the beautiful garden, and explore the museum’s temporary exhibitions.

Free or Paid: Entry to Musée Rodin and its garden is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students, seniors, and visitors under 26.

Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, Paris

Overview: Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac is a museum dedicated to the arts and civilizations of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas, housed in a striking contemporary building near the Eiffel Tower.

History: The museum was inaugurated in 2006 under the presidency of Jacques Chirac, showcasing a diverse collection of artifacts and artworks from indigenous cultures around the world.

Since when: Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac has been enriching Paris’s cultural landscape since its opening in 2006.

Review: With its eclectic collection and innovative exhibitions, Musée du quai Branly offers a fascinating journey through the cultural diversity of humanity.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully immerse yourself in the museum’s exhibitions.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 9 and disembark at the Alma-Marceau station, which is a short walk from Musée du quai Branly.

What to do: Explore the museum’s permanent and temporary exhibitions, discover artifacts from diverse cultures, and enjoy the panoramic views of the Eiffel Tower from the museum’s garden.

Free or Paid: Entry to Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students, seniors, and visitors under 26.

Pont des Arts, Paris

Overview: Pont des Arts, also known as the “Bridge of Arts,” is a pedestrian bridge spanning the Seine River, known for its romantic ambiance and iconic “love locks.”

History: Originally built in the early 19th century as a pedestrian bridge linking the Louvre Palace to the Institut de France, Pont des Arts has become a symbol of love and romance over the years.

Since when: Pont des Arts has been a popular spot for couples and tourists since its construction in the early 19th century.

Review: With its stunning views of the Seine River and surrounding landmarks, Pont des Arts offers a romantic setting for leisurely walks and enjoying the beauty of Paris.

When to go: Visit during the evening to see the bridge illuminated against the night sky, or during the day for a picturesque stroll along the riverbanks.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Louvre–Rivoli station, which is located near Pont des Arts.

What to do: Take a romantic stroll across the bridge, enjoy views of the Seine River and iconic landmarks such as the Louvre Museum and Notre-Dame Cathedral, and add a love lock to the bridge’s railing.

Free or Paid: Visiting Pont des Arts is free for all to enjoy its romantic ambiance and panoramic views of Paris.

Place du Tertre, Paris

Overview: Place du Tertre is a charming square in Montmartre known for its bustling atmosphere, outdoor cafes, and portrait artists.

History: Once a meeting place for artists such as Picasso and Van Gogh in the 19th century, Place du Tertre retains its artistic heritage with numerous painters and caricaturists.

Since when: Place du Tertre has been a hub for artistic expression and creativity since the Belle Époque era of the late 19th century.

Review: With its lively ambiance, talented artists, and picturesque surroundings, Place du Tertre offers a delightful glimpse into the bohemian spirit of Montmartre.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and interact with the artists at leisure.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 12 and disembark at the Abbesses station, which is a short walk from Place du Tertre.

What to do: Explore the square’s vibrant art scene, have your portrait drawn by a local artist, enjoy a coffee or meal at one of the surrounding cafes, and soak in the lively atmosphere.

Free or Paid: Exploring Place du Tertre is free, but commissioning artwork or dining at cafes may involve costs.

Wall of Love, Paris

Overview: The Wall of Love, or Le Mur des Je t’aime, is a unique art installation in Montmartre featuring the phrase “I love you” in over 250 languages.

History: Created by artists Frédéric Baron and Claire Kito in 2000, the Wall of Love serves as a symbol of love and unity in a city renowned for romance.

Since when: The Wall of Love has been spreading messages of love and diversity since its unveiling in 2000.

Review: With its colorful tiles and heartfelt messages, the Wall of Love offers a touching reminder of the universal language of love.

When to go: Visit during the daytime to fully appreciate the vibrant colors of the tiles and the messages written in various languages.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 12 and disembark at the Abbesses station, which is a short walk from the Wall of Love.

What to do: Admire the mosaic artwork, search for messages in different languages, take photos, and reflect on the message of love and unity.

Free or Paid: Viewing the Wall of Love is free for all visitors to enjoy.

Le Marais, Paris

Overview: Le Marais is a historic district in Paris known for its cobblestone streets, historic architecture, trendy boutiques, and vibrant LGBTQ+ community.

History: Originally a marshland, Le Marais underwent urban development in the 17th century, becoming a fashionable residential area for nobility and later a cultural hotspot.

Since when: Le Marais has been a cultural and architectural gem of Paris since its transformation in the 17th century.

Review: With its eclectic mix of museums, galleries, shops, and cafes, Le Marais offers a vibrant blend of history, culture, and modernity.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays to explore the district’s shops and museums, or during the evening for a taste of its lively nightlife.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Saint-Paul station, which provides access to various attractions in Le Marais.

What to do: Wander through the picturesque streets, visit museums such as the Musée Picasso and Musée Carnavalet, shop at trendy boutiques, and enjoy delicious cuisine at local cafes and restaurants.

Free or Paid: Exploring Le Marais is free, but entrance to museums or dining at restaurants may involve costs.

Musée National Picasso-Paris, Paris

Overview: Musée National Picasso-Paris is a renowned art museum dedicated to the works of Pablo Picasso, showcasing the artist’s vast collection of paintings, sculptures, drawings, and ceramics.

History: Housed in the historic Hôtel Salé in the Marais district, the museum was established in 1985 and holds the largest public collection of Picasso’s works in the world.

Since when: Musée National Picasso-Paris has been a treasure trove of Picasso’s artistic legacy since its inauguration in 1985.

Review: With its extensive collection and insightful exhibitions, Musée National Picasso-Paris offers a comprehensive journey through the life and work of one of the 20th century’s greatest artists.

When to go: Visit during the weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully immerse yourself in Picasso’s masterpieces.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 1 and disembark at the Saint-Paul station, which is a short walk from the museum.

What to do: Explore Picasso’s diverse oeuvre spanning various artistic periods, admire his iconic masterpieces such as “Guernica,” and gain insight into the artist’s creative process and influences.

Free or Paid: Entry to Musée National Picasso-Paris is paid, with various ticket options available including discounts for students, seniors, and visitors under 26.

Moulin Rouge, Paris

Overview: Moulin Rouge is a legendary cabaret in the Montmartre district, renowned for its extravagant shows, glamorous atmosphere, and iconic red windmill.

History: Established in 1889 by Joseph Oller and Charles Zidler, Moulin Rouge quickly became a symbol of Parisian nightlife and bohemian culture, attracting artists, writers, and celebrities.

Since when: Moulin Rouge has been dazzling audiences with its spectacular performances since its grand opening in 1889.

Review: With its dazzling costumes, high-energy performances, and captivating ambiance, Moulin Rouge offers an unforgettable night of entertainment and glamour.

When to go: Book tickets in advance for an evening show to experience the full splendor of Moulin Rouge’s cabaret performances.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 2 and disembark at the Blanche station, which is located near Moulin Rouge.

What to do: Enjoy a mesmerizing cabaret show featuring dancers, singers, and acrobats, sip champagne, and immerse yourself in the vibrant atmosphere of Belle Époque Paris.

Free or Paid: Entry to Moulin Rouge requires purchasing tickets for the cabaret show, with various packages available.

Trocadéro Square, Paris

Overview: Trocadéro Square, officially known as the Place du Trocadéro, is a vast public square in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, offering stunning views of the Eiffel Tower and the Champ de Mars.

History: Constructed for the 1878 World’s Fair, Trocadéro Square was originally designed as a platform for the Palais du Trocadéro, a grand palace showcasing French art and industry.

Since when: Trocadéro Square has been a prominent landmark of Paris since its construction for the 1878 World’s Fair.

Review: With its expansive terraces, ornate fountains, and panoramic views of the Eiffel Tower, Trocadéro Square provides a picturesque setting for sightseeing and photography.

When to go: Visit during the evening to see the Eiffel Tower illuminated against the night sky, or during the day for stunning views and a relaxed atmosphere.

How to go: Accessible by metro, visitors can take Line 6 and disembark at the Trocadéro station, which is located near the square.

What to do: Take photos with the Eiffel Tower in the background, relax in the square’s gardens, admire the fountains, and visit nearby attractions such as the Musée de l’Homme.

Free or Paid: Entry to Trocadéro Square is free for all visitors to enjoy its panoramic views and picturesque surroundings.

External links

32 Best Things to Do in Paris, France
42 Best Things to Do in Paris
A Detailed Paris Itinerary for 3-5 Days
First Time Guide to Paris
THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Paris
The 50 best things to do in Paris right now
The absolute must-do/see in Paris? : r/ParisTravelGuide


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