Things to do in Paris

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Things to do in Paris

Things to do in Paris: Based on NeemTime research from most popular to just popular.

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Eiffel Tower, Paris

Overview: The Eiffel Tower is an iconic landmark and symbol of Paris, offering breathtaking views of the city from its observation decks.

History: Designed by Gustave Eiffel for the 1889 World’s Fair, the Eiffel Tower was initially met with controversy but has since become one of the most recognizable structures in the world.

Since When: The Eiffel Tower has graced the Paris skyline since its completion in 1889.

Review: A must-visit attraction, the Eiffel Tower captivates visitors with its intricate ironwork and panoramic vistas, though long lines can be expected during peak times.

When to Go: Early mornings or evenings offer shorter queues and stunning views, while nighttime visits showcase the tower illuminated against the Parisian skyline.

How to Go: Located in the 7th arrondissement, the Eiffel Tower is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Ascend to the observation decks for unparalleled views, enjoy a meal at one of the tower’s restaurants, and explore the history and engineering behind this iconic monument.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Eiffel Tower’s observation decks requires paid tickets, with different rates for various levels of access.

Louvre Museum, Paris

Overview: The Louvre Museum is the world’s largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, housing thousands of works of art spanning centuries and cultures.

History: Originally a royal palace, the Louvre was transformed into a public museum during the French Revolution and has since grown into a cultural institution of global significance.

Since When: The Louvre has been showcasing its vast art collection to the public since the late 18th century.

Review: With its impressive collection ranging from ancient artifacts to renowned masterpieces like the Mona Lisa, the Louvre offers an unparalleled art experience, though navigating its vast galleries can be overwhelming.

When to Go: Weekdays or early mornings are best to avoid crowds, and consider visiting during the less crowded months of November to March.

How to Go: Located in the 1st arrondissement, the Louvre is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at iconic artworks, explore the museum’s diverse collections, and don’t miss the stunning architecture of the Louvre Pyramid.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Louvre requires paid tickets, though entry is free on the first Saturday of each month from October to March.

Arc de Triomphe, Paris

Overview: The Arc de Triomphe is a historic monument honoring those who fought and died for France, standing majestically at the western end of the Champs-Élysées.

History: Commissioned by Napoleon in 1806, the Arc de Triomphe was completed in 1836 and has since served as a symbol of French patriotism and military victory.

Since When: The Arc de Triomphe has stood as a symbol of France’s military glory since its completion in 1836.

Review: Offering panoramic views of Paris from its observation deck and intricate sculptural details, the Arc de Triomphe provides a poignant and memorable experience, though lines can be long.

When to Go: Early mornings or evenings offer quieter times for visiting, and consider visiting during off-peak seasons to avoid crowds.

How to Go: Situated at the Place Charles de Gaulle, the Arc de Triomphe is accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Climb to the top for stunning views of Paris, admire the intricate reliefs and sculptures, and pay respects at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Arc de Triomphe’s observation deck requires paid tickets, though entry is free for EU residents under 26 years old.

Champ de Mars, Paris

Overview: Champ de Mars is a vast public greenspace in Paris, offering stunning views of the Eiffel Tower and serving as a popular spot for picnics and leisure activities.

History: Originally used for military drills and parades, Champ de Mars became a public park in the late 18th century during the French Revolution.

Since When: Champ de Mars has been a public park since the late 18th century.

Review: With its expansive lawns and iconic views of the Eiffel Tower, Champ de Mars provides a picturesque setting for relaxation and enjoying the Parisian skyline.

When to Go: Visit during spring or summer for pleasant weather and vibrant greenery.

How to Go: Situated near the Eiffel Tower in the 7th arrondissement, Champ de Mars is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Have a picnic on the grass, take a leisurely stroll, or simply relax and soak in the atmosphere while admiring the Eiffel Tower.

Free or Paid: Admission to Champ de Mars is free.

Palace of Versailles, Paris

Overview: The Palace of Versailles is a magnificent royal residence and UNESCO World Heritage Site renowned for its opulent architecture, lavish gardens, and rich history.

History: Originally a hunting lodge, the Palace of Versailles was transformed into a grand palace by King Louis XIV in the 17th century, becoming the seat of French political power until the French Revolution.

Since When: The Palace of Versailles has been an emblem of French royalty and grandeur since the 17th century.

Review: A masterpiece of French Baroque architecture, the Palace of Versailles dazzles visitors with its ornate interiors, sprawling gardens, and historical significance.

When to Go: Weekdays outside of peak tourist season offer shorter queues and a more enjoyable experience.

How to Go: Located in Versailles, the palace is accessible by train from Paris, followed by a short walk or bus ride from the train station.

What to Do: Explore the palace’s opulent rooms, stroll through the manicured gardens, and marvel at the spectacular Hall of Mirrors.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Palace of Versailles and its gardens requires paid tickets, with various ticket options available for different areas of the estate.

Trocadéro Gardens, Paris

Overview: Trocadéro Gardens offer panoramic views of the Eiffel Tower and serve as a picturesque setting for leisurely walks, picnics, and enjoying the beauty of Paris.

History: Created for the 1878 World’s Fair, Trocadéro Gardens were redesigned in the 1930s to showcase the Palais de Chaillot and provide unobstructed views of the Eiffel Tower.

Since When: Trocadéro Gardens have been enchanting visitors with their scenic beauty since the late 19th century.

Review: With its elegant fountains, manicured lawns, and stunning vistas, Trocadéro Gardens offer a tranquil escape from the city bustle and a perfect spot for photos.

When to Go: Visit during sunrise or sunset for magical views of the Eiffel Tower against the changing sky.

How to Go: Situated in the 16th arrondissement, Trocadéro Gardens are easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Enjoy a leisurely stroll, have a picnic while admiring the views, or take memorable photos with the Eiffel Tower as the backdrop.

Free or Paid: Admission to Trocadéro Gardens is free.

The Basilica of Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre, Paris

Overview: The Basilica of Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre is a majestic church atop the highest point in Paris, offering stunning views of the city and a serene place of worship.

History: Built in the late 19th century as a symbol of penance following the Franco-Prussian War, Sacré-Cœur is known for its Romano-Byzantine architecture and white-domed exterior.

Since When: The Basilica of Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre has graced the Paris skyline since its completion in 1914.

Review: With its striking beauty and panoramic views, Sacré-Cœur is a must-visit for both religious significance and architectural splendor.

When to Go: Early mornings or evenings offer quieter times for visiting and breathtaking views of Paris.

How to Go: Situated in Montmartre, Sacré-Cœur is accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Admire the breathtaking architecture, soak in the panoramic views of Paris from the esplanade, and explore the charming Montmartre neighborhood.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Basilica of Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre is free, though donations are welcome.

Jardin du Luxembourg, Paris

Overview: Jardin du Luxembourg is a historic park in Paris known for its lush greenery, elegant statues, and serene atmosphere, offering a peaceful escape from the city.

History: Originally created in the early 17th century for Marie de’ Medici, Jardin du Luxembourg has evolved into a beloved public park with formal gardens, fountains, and an ornate palace.

Since When: Jardin du Luxembourg has been enchanting visitors with its beauty since the 17th century.

Review: With its picturesque landscapes and diverse flora, Jardin du Luxembourg is a favorite destination for relaxation, leisurely walks, and enjoying the beauty of nature.

When to Go: Visit during spring to see the gardens in full bloom or autumn for vibrant foliage colors.

How to Go: Located in the 6th arrondissement, Jardin du Luxembourg is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the formal gardens, relax by the fountains, admire the statues and sculptures, or enjoy a leisurely boat ride on the pond.

Free or Paid: Admission to Jardin du Luxembourg is free.

Tuileries Garden, Paris

Overview: Tuileries Garden is a historic park in Paris adjacent to the Louvre Museum, featuring formal gardens, tree-lined promenades, and iconic sculptures.

History: Created in the 16th century for Catherine de’ Medici, Tuileries Garden was once part of the Tuileries Palace and became a public park after the palace’s destruction in the 19th century.

Since When: Tuileries Garden has been a cherished public park since the 19th century.

Review: Offering a tranquil retreat in the heart of the city, Tuileries Garden is perfect for leisurely strolls, picnics, and enjoying the beauty of Parisian landscapes.

When to Go: Visit during spring or summer for blooming flowers and warm weather, or in autumn for vibrant foliage.

How to Go: Situated between the Louvre Museum and Place de la Concorde, Tuileries Garden is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Wander through the formal gardens, relax on the iconic green chairs, admire the statues and fountains, or enjoy a refreshing drink at a café.

Free or Paid: Admission to Tuileries Garden is free.

Musée d’Orsay, Paris

Overview: Musée d’Orsay is a renowned art museum housed in a former railway station, showcasing an extensive collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterpieces.

History: Originally constructed as a railway station for the 1900 World’s Fair, Musée d’Orsay was repurposed as an art museum in the late 20th century.

Since When: Musée d’Orsay has been open to the public as an art museum since 1986.

Review: With its impressive collection and stunning Beaux-Arts architecture, Musée d’Orsay offers a captivating journey through the development of modern art.

When to Go: Weekdays or early mornings are ideal for avoiding crowds and enjoying the artworks at a leisurely pace.

How to Go: Located on the Left Bank of the Seine, Musée d’Orsay is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore iconic works by artists such as Monet, Van Gogh, and Renoir, and don’t miss the museum’s stunning architecture and panoramic views of Paris.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée d’Orsay requires paid tickets, with discounts available for students, seniors, and groups.

Louvre Pyramid, Paris

Overview: The Louvre Pyramid is a modern glass pyramid serving as the main entrance to the Louvre Museum, adding a contemporary touch to the historic palace.

History: Designed by architect I.M. Pei and completed in 1989, the Louvre Pyramid has become an iconic symbol of the Louvre Museum and Paris.

Since When: The Louvre Pyramid has graced the courtyard of the Louvre since its completion in 1989.

Review: With its striking design and central location, the Louvre Pyramid serves as a grand entrance to one of the world’s largest and most famous museums.

When to Go: Visit during early mornings or evenings to admire the pyramid against the backdrop of the Louvre’s historic façade.

How to Go: Situated in the courtyard of the Louvre Museum, the Louvre Pyramid is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at the geometric design of the pyramid, take photos from various angles, and explore the treasures within the Louvre Museum.

Free or Paid: Viewing the Louvre Pyramid from the outside is free, but admission to the Louvre Museum requires paid tickets.

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, Paris

Overview: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris is a Gothic masterpiece known for its stunning architecture, intricate sculptures, and rich history as a symbol of French culture.

History: Construction of Notre-Dame began in the 12th century and continued over several centuries, with the cathedral becoming a symbol of Parisian identity and spirituality.

Since When: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris has stood as an iconic landmark of Paris since its completion in the 14th century.

Review: Despite the devastating fire in 2019, Notre-Dame remains a symbol of resilience and architectural brilliance, drawing visitors from around the world to admire its beauty.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and appreciate the cathedral’s intricate details.

How to Go: Located on the Île de la Cité, Notre-Dame is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at the intricate facade, explore the interior with its stunning stained glass windows and ornate decorations, and climb the towers for panoramic views of Paris.

Free or Paid: Admission to Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris is free for individual visitors, though there may be charges for certain events or guided tours.

La Villette, Paris

Overview: La Villette is a vibrant cultural complex in Paris, featuring parks, museums, theaters, and entertainment venues, offering something for everyone to enjoy.

History: Originally an industrial area, La Villette was transformed into a cultural hub in the 1980s, revitalizing the site and attracting visitors with its diverse attractions.

Since When: La Villette has been a dynamic cultural destination since its redevelopment in the 1980s.

Review: With its eclectic mix of attractions, including the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie and the Grande Halle de la Villette, La Villette offers a unique blend of art, science, and entertainment.

When to Go: Weekends often feature special events and performances, making it an exciting time to visit.

How to Go: Located in the 19th arrondissement, La Villette is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museums and exhibitions, enjoy a concert or theater performance, or simply relax in one of the many green spaces.

Free or Paid: Admission to La Villette’s attractions varies, with some offering free entry and others requiring paid tickets.

Place de la Concorde, Paris

Overview: Place de la Concorde is one of the largest public squares in Paris, known for its iconic obelisk, fountains, and historical significance.

History: Originally named Place Louis XV, Place de la Concorde was redesigned during the French Revolution and became a site of significant historical events, including public executions.

Since When: Place de la Concorde has been a focal point of Parisian history and culture since its redesign in the late 18th century.

Review: With its grandeur, historical significance, and central location, Place de la Concorde is a must-visit for those interested in Parisian history and architecture.

When to Go: Visit during the evening to see the square illuminated, or during the day to admire the views of the surrounding landmarks, including the Champs-Élysées and the Eiffel Tower.

How to Go: Situated between the Tuileries Garden and the Champs-Élysées, Place de la Concorde is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll around the square, admire the Luxor Obelisk and the Fountain of River Commerce and Navigation, and soak in the atmosphere of this historic site.

Free or Paid: Admission to Place de la Concorde is free.

The Centre Pompidou, Paris

Overview: The Centre Pompidou is a groundbreaking cultural institution in Paris, known for its avant-garde architecture and extensive collection of modern and contemporary art.

History: Designed by architects Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, the Centre Pompidou opened in 1977 as a hub for contemporary art, attracting visitors with its innovative design and eclectic exhibitions.

Since When: The Centre Pompidou has been pushing the boundaries of art and culture since its opening in 1977.

Review: With its bold architecture, diverse exhibitions, and lively atmosphere, the Centre Pompidou offers a dynamic and enriching experience for art enthusiasts and visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Weekdays are generally quieter, allowing for a more leisurely exploration of the museum’s collections and temporary exhibitions.

How to Go: Located in the Beaubourg area of the 4th arrondissement, the Centre Pompidou is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s extensive collection of modern and contemporary art, attend a film screening or live performance, and enjoy panoramic views of Paris from the rooftop terrace.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Centre Pompidou’s permanent collections requires paid tickets, with free entry on the first Sunday of each month. Temporary exhibitions may have separate admission fees.

Panthéon, Paris

Overview: The Panthéon is a neoclassical mausoleum and former church in Paris, housing the remains of notable French figures and offering stunning views from its dome.

History: Originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve, the Panthéon was later repurposed as a mausoleum during the French Revolution to honor distinguished citizens.

Since When: The Panthéon has served as a mausoleum since the late 18th century, with its current neoclassical structure completed in 1790.

Review: With its imposing architecture and historical significance, the Panthéon offers a fascinating glimpse into France’s past and pays homage to its revered figures.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays to avoid crowds, and consider going in the morning to enjoy the natural light filtering through the dome.

How to Go: Situated in the Latin Quarter, the Panthéon is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the crypt containing the remains of luminaries like Voltaire and Rousseau, climb to the top for panoramic views of Paris, and admire the majestic dome.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Panthéon varies, with entry to the main church area being free, while access to the crypt and dome may require paid tickets.

Jardin des Plantes, Paris

Overview: Jardin des Plantes is a historic botanical garden in Paris, featuring beautifully landscaped grounds, greenhouses, and a zoo, making it a delightful retreat for nature lovers.

History: Established in 1626 as a royal garden for medicinal plants, Jardin des Plantes later became a public botanical garden and scientific institution in the 18th century.

Since When: Jardin des Plantes has been a haven for botanical enthusiasts since the 17th century, with its current layout dating back to the 18th century.

Review: With its diverse plant collections, tranquil ambiance, and educational exhibits, Jardin des Plantes offers a serene escape from the city hustle.

When to Go: Visit during spring to see the gardens in full bloom, or in autumn for vibrant foliage colors.

How to Go: Located in the 5th arrondissement, Jardin des Plantes is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Wander through the various gardens, explore the greenhouses filled with exotic plants, visit the National Museum of Natural History, and enjoy a leisurely stroll along the pathways.

Free or Paid: Admission to Jardin des Plantes is free, though entry to certain attractions within the garden, such as the greenhouses and zoo, may require paid tickets.

Palais Garnier, Paris

Overview: Palais Garnier is a magnificent opera house in Paris, renowned for its opulent architecture, ornate interiors, and world-class performances.

History: Built in the late 19th century under the direction of architect Charles Garnier, Palais Garnier was intended to showcase the grandeur of the Second Empire and remains a symbol of Parisian elegance.

Since When: Palais Garnier has been captivating audiences with its stunning performances and architectural splendor since its inauguration in 1875.

Review: With its breathtaking Grand Foyer, ornate staircase, and dazzling chandelier, Palais Garnier offers a sumptuous setting for experiencing the magic of opera and ballet.

When to Go: Attend an evening performance for the full experience of Palais Garnier’s glamour and theatricality.

How to Go: Located in the 9th arrondissement, Palais Garnier is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Attend a performance of opera or ballet, take a guided tour to admire the opulent interiors, or simply marvel at the exterior architecture.

Free or Paid: Admission to Palais Garnier varies depending on the event or tour, with tickets for performances and guided tours requiring payment.

Sainte-Chapelle, Paris

Overview: Sainte-Chapelle is a stunning Gothic chapel known for its exquisite stained glass windows depicting biblical scenes, creating an ethereal atmosphere.

History: Built in the 13th century to house religious relics, Sainte-Chapelle served as a royal chapel for the French monarchy and remains a masterpiece of medieval architecture.

Since When: Sainte-Chapelle has been captivating visitors with its divine beauty since its completion in 1248.

Review: With its awe-inspiring stained glass windows and intricate stone carvings, Sainte-Chapelle offers a transcendent experience that is not to be missed.

When to Go: Visit during the morning or late afternoon for the best lighting to illuminate the vibrant colors of the stained glass.

How to Go: Located on the Île de la Cité, Sainte-Chapelle is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at the breathtaking stained glass windows, admire the intricate Gothic architecture, and attend a classical music concert for a truly immersive experience.

Free or Paid: Admission to Sainte-Chapelle requires paid tickets.

Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre, Paris

Overview: The Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre is a majestic church perched atop the highest point in Paris, offering panoramic views of the city and a serene place of worship.

History: Built in the late 19th century as a symbol of penance following the Franco-Prussian War, Sacré-Cœur is known for its Romano-Byzantine architecture and white-domed exterior.

Since When: The Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre has graced the Paris skyline since its completion in 1914.

Review: A must-visit attraction, Sacré-Cœur captivates visitors with its striking beauty and panoramic vistas, though long lines can be expected during peak times.

When to Go: Early mornings or evenings offer quieter times for visiting, and consider visiting during off-peak seasons to avoid crowds.

How to Go: Situated in Montmartre, Sacré-Cœur is accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Admire the breathtaking architecture, soak in the panoramic views of Paris from the esplanade, and explore the charming Montmartre neighborhood.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Basilique du Sacré-Cœur de Montmartre is free.

Luxembourg Gardens, Paris

Overview: Luxembourg Gardens is a historic park in Paris, known for its formal French gardens, tree-lined promenades, and tranquil atmosphere.

History: Created in the early 17th century for Marie de’ Medici, Luxembourg Gardens became a public park in the 19th century and has since become a beloved retreat for Parisians and visitors alike.

Since When: Luxembourg Gardens has been enchanting visitors with its beauty since the 17th century, with its current layout dating back to the 19th century.

Review: With its manicured lawns, flowerbeds, and elegant fountains, Luxembourg Gardens offers a serene oasis in the heart of Paris, perfect for relaxation and leisurely strolls.

When to Go: Visit during spring to see the gardens in full bloom or autumn for vibrant foliage colors.

How to Go: Located in the 6th arrondissement, Luxembourg Gardens is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Wander through the formal gardens, relax by the fountains, admire the statues and sculptures, or enjoy a leisurely boat ride on the pond.

Free or Paid: Admission to Luxembourg Gardens is free.

Pont Alexandre III, Paris

Overview: Pont Alexandre III is an ornate bridge spanning the Seine River in Paris, celebrated for its extravagant Art Nouveau and Beaux-Arts design.

History: Constructed for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, Pont Alexandre III was named after Tsar Alexander III of Russia to symbolize the Franco-Russian alliance.

Since When: Pont Alexandre III has graced the Parisian skyline since its inauguration in 1900.

Review: With its majestic sculptures, gilded decorations, and sweeping views of the Seine and iconic landmarks, Pont Alexandre III is a masterpiece of bridge engineering and architectural beauty.

When to Go: Visit during sunset for breathtaking views and to see the bridge illuminated, creating a romantic ambiance.

How to Go: Located near the Grand Palais and Les Invalides, Pont Alexandre III is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Walk along the bridge to admire its intricate details, take photos of its ornate lampposts and sculptures, and enjoy the scenic views of the Seine River.

Free or Paid: Access to Pont Alexandre III is free.

Parc de Bercy, Paris

Overview: Parc de Bercy is a modern park in Paris, featuring landscaped gardens, water features, and contemporary sculptures, offering a peaceful retreat in the bustling city.

History: Created in the 1990s on the site of former wine warehouses, Parc de Bercy is part of the Bercy neighborhood’s revitalization project.

Since When: Parc de Bercy has been a tranquil green space for Parisians and visitors to enjoy since its opening in 1994.

Review: With its serene ambiance, diverse plantings, and cultural attractions like the Cinémathèque Française, Parc de Bercy is a hidden gem worth exploring.

When to Go: Visit during spring or summer to see the gardens in full bloom and enjoy outdoor activities like picnics and leisurely walks.

How to Go: Situated in the 12th arrondissement, Parc de Bercy is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the gardens, relax by the tranquil ponds, explore the Cinémathèque Française, or enjoy a picnic on the grass.

Free or Paid: Admission to Parc de Bercy is free.

Musée Grévin, Paris

Overview: Musée Grévin is a waxwork museum in Paris, showcasing lifelike wax figures of historical figures, celebrities, and fictional characters in immersive settings.

History: Founded in 1882 by caricaturist Alfred Grévin, Musée Grévin has delighted visitors for over a century with its meticulously crafted wax figures and interactive exhibits.

Since When: Musée Grévin has been captivating audiences with its lifelike wax figures since its opening in 1882.

Review: With its impressive attention to detail and diverse array of personalities, Musée Grévin offers a fun and engaging experience for visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Weekdays are generally less crowded, allowing for a more leisurely exploration of the museum’s exhibits.

How to Go: Located in the 9th arrondissement near the Grands Boulevards, Musée Grévin is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Pose for photos with your favorite celebrities, explore the interactive exhibits, and learn about French history through lifelike wax figures.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée Grévin requires paid tickets, with discounts available for children and seniors.

Place des Vosges, Paris

Overview: Place des Vosges is a picturesque square in the Marais district of Paris, featuring elegant 17th-century architecture and charming arcades.

History: Originally known as Place Royale, Place des Vosges was built by Henry IV in the early 17th century and is one of the oldest planned squares in Paris.

Since When: Place des Vosges has graced the Parisian landscape since its completion in 1612.

Review: With its symmetrical layout, tranquil gardens, and historic buildings, Place des Vosges offers a serene oasis in the heart of the bustling city.

When to Go: Visit during the spring or summer months to enjoy the gardens in bloom and to experience the lively atmosphere of the square.

How to Go: Located in the Marais district, Place des Vosges is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll around the square, relax on the benches, admire the architecture, and visit the boutiques and galleries in the surrounding area.

Free or Paid: Admission to Place des Vosges is free.

Bois de Boulogne, Paris

Overview: Bois de Boulogne is a vast public park on the western edge of Paris, known for its tranquil lakes, wooded areas, and recreational activities.

History: Originally a royal hunting ground, Bois de Boulogne was transformed into a public park in the 19th century by Napoleon III and Baron Haussmann as part of their urban planning efforts.

Since When: Bois de Boulogne has been a beloved green space for Parisians and visitors alike since it was opened to the public in 1852.

Review: With its sprawling landscapes, botanical gardens, and attractions like the Jardin d’Acclimatation, Bois de Boulogne offers a peaceful retreat from the city hustle.

When to Go: Visit during the spring or summer for outdoor activities like picnics, boating, and cycling, or in autumn to see the foliage colors.

How to Go: Situated in the 16th arrondissement, Bois de Boulogne is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Enjoy a leisurely boat ride on the lakes, explore the walking trails, visit the Jardin d’Acclimatation amusement park, or simply relax amidst nature.

Free or Paid: Admission to Bois de Boulogne is free, though certain attractions within the park may require paid tickets.

Seine River, Paris

Overview: The Seine River is the iconic waterway that flows through the heart of Paris, dividing the city into the Left Bank and Right Bank, and offering scenic views of landmarks like the Eiffel Tower and Notre-Dame Cathedral.

History: The Seine River has played a vital role in the history and development of Paris, serving as a major trade route and contributing to the city’s cultural and economic prosperity.

Since When: The Seine River has been a central feature of Parisian life since the city’s founding over 2,000 years ago.

Review: Whether enjoyed from a cruise boat, a riverside promenade, or one of the many bridges spanning its waters, the Seine River offers a timeless charm and romantic ambiance.

When to Go: Any time of year offers its own charm, but sunset cruises or evening strolls along the banks provide particularly magical experiences.

How to Go: With numerous bridges and pathways, the Seine River is easily accessible by foot, bike, or boat, and can be reached from various points throughout the city.

What to Do: Take a leisurely cruise to admire the cityscape, enjoy a picnic on one of the riverbanks, or simply stroll along the quays and bridges for breathtaking views.

Free or Paid: Enjoying the Seine River from its banks is free, while cruises and boat tours may require paid tickets.

Parc des Buttes-Chaumont, Paris

Overview: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is a picturesque park in Paris featuring dramatic cliffs, a scenic lake, and lush gardens, offering a peaceful escape from the city bustle.

History: Created in the 19th century under the direction of Emperor Napoleon III, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont was built on former gypsum quarries and served as a symbol of urban renewal.

Since When: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont has been enchanting visitors since its opening in 1867.

Review: With its varied landscapes, stunning views, and hidden grottoes, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is a hidden gem beloved by locals and tourists alike.

When to Go: Spring and summer are ideal for visiting when the gardens are in bloom and outdoor activities like picnics and leisurely strolls are enjoyable.

How to Go: Located in the 19th arrondissement, Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely walk around the lake, enjoy a picnic on the grassy slopes, explore the Temple de la Sibylle perched atop a rocky outcrop, and savor panoramic views of Paris.

Free or Paid: Admission to Parc des Buttes-Chaumont is free.

Grand Palais, Paris

Overview: Grand Palais is a historic exhibition hall and cultural venue in Paris, known for its magnificent glass roof and hosting prestigious art exhibitions, fashion shows, and events.

History: Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, the Grand Palais was designed as a showcase of French art and technology and has since become an iconic symbol of Parisian grandeur.

Since When: Grand Palais has been a cultural landmark in Paris since its inauguration in 1900.

Review: With its grand architecture and versatile spaces, Grand Palais offers a unique setting for experiencing art, culture, and entertainment on a grand scale.

When to Go: Visit during one of the major exhibitions or events hosted at the Grand Palais for an enriching cultural experience.

How to Go: Situated near the Champs-Élysées in the 8th arrondissement, Grand Palais is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Attend an art exhibition, fashion show, or cultural event, admire the glass roof and architectural details, and explore the nearby attractions.

Free or Paid: Admission to Grand Palais varies depending on the event or exhibition, with some requiring paid tickets.

Place de la Bastille, Paris

Overview: Place de la Bastille is a historic square in Paris known for its significance in the French Revolution and its iconic July Column commemorating the July Revolution of 1830.


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History: Originally the site of the Bastille fortress, Place de la Bastille became a symbol of liberty and revolution following the storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789.

Since When: Place de la Bastille has been a symbol of French democracy and revolutionary spirit for over two centuries.

Review: With its historical significance and bustling atmosphere, Place de la Bastille offers a glimpse into France’s revolutionary past and vibrant present.

When to Go: Visit during the day to explore the square and nearby attractions, or in the evening to experience the lively nightlife of the surrounding area.

How to Go: Located in the 4th, 11th, and 12th arrondissements, Place de la Bastille is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Admire the July Column and learn about its history, explore the nearby neighborhoods of Bastille and Marais, and enjoy a meal or drink at one of the many cafes and restaurants.

Free or Paid: Admission to Place de la Bastille is free.

Shakespeare and Company, Paris

Overview: Shakespeare and Company is a legendary English-language bookstore in Paris, known for its cozy ambiance, extensive collection of books, and literary history.

History: Founded by George Whitman in 1951, Shakespeare and Company has been a haven for writers and readers, with notable literary figures like Ernest Hemingway and James Joyce frequenting its shelves.

Since When: Shakespeare and Company has been a beloved landmark in Paris’s literary scene since its establishment in 1951.

Review: With its charming interior, welcoming atmosphere, and regular literary events, Shakespeare and Company is a must-visit for book lovers and history enthusiasts alike.

When to Go: Visit during quieter times to fully immerse yourself in the bookstore’s ambiance and explore its extensive collection at your leisure.

How to Go: Located near Notre-Dame Cathedral in the Latin Quarter, Shakespeare and Company is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Browse the shelves for rare finds and literary classics, attend a book reading or poetry recital, and soak in the bohemian atmosphere of this iconic bookstore.

Free or Paid: Admission to Shakespeare and Company is free, though purchasing books is encouraged to support the independent bookstore.

Montmartre, Paris

Overview: Montmartre is a historic neighborhood in Paris known for its artistic heritage, bohemian vibe, and stunning views from the hilltop of the Sacré-Cœur Basilica.

History: Once a village outside Paris, Montmartre became a magnet for artists and writers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with iconic figures like Picasso and Van Gogh calling it home.

Since When: Montmartre has been a cultural hub and artistic enclave since the Belle Époque period of the late 19th century.

Review: With its charming streets, lively squares, and bustling cafes, Montmartre offers a glimpse into Paris’s artistic past and present, though it can get crowded with tourists during peak times.

When to Go: Visit in the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the neighborhood’s charm and avoid the crowds, or in the evening for stunning sunset views over Paris.

How to Go: Situated in the 18th arrondissement, Montmartre is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the winding streets and staircases, visit iconic landmarks like the Sacré-Cœur Basilica and Moulin Rouge, admire street art, and enjoy a meal or drink at a local cafe.

Free or Paid: Admission to Montmartre is free, though some attractions may have entry fees.

Parc Monceau, Paris

Overview: Parc Monceau is a picturesque park in Paris’s 8th arrondissement, known for its English-style gardens, ornate gates, and collection of sculptures.

History: Created in the late 18th century as a private garden for the Duke of Chartres, Parc Monceau was later opened to the public and became a favorite retreat for Parisians and visitors alike.

Since When: Parc Monceau has been enchanting visitors with its beauty and tranquility since it was opened to the public in 1861.

Review: With its manicured lawns, winding pathways, and eclectic mix of architectural styles, Parc Monceau offers a serene oasis in the heart of the city, perfect for leisurely strolls and picnics.

When to Go: Visit during the spring to see the gardens in full bloom, or in autumn for vibrant foliage colors.

How to Go: Located in the 8th arrondissement, Parc Monceau is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely walk around the park, admire the statues and follies, relax by the pond or under the shade of a tree, and enjoy a picnic on the grass.

Free or Paid: Admission to Parc Monceau is free.

Domaine National du Palais-Royal, Paris

Overview: Domaine National du Palais-Royal is a historic palace and garden complex in Paris, known for its elegant architecture, tranquil gardens, and cultural attractions.

History: Originally built as a royal residence in the 17th century, Domaine National du Palais-Royal has been home to French royalty, including Louis XIV, and served as a center for culture and politics.

Since When: Domaine National du Palais-Royal has stood as a symbol of French heritage and elegance since its construction in the 17th century.

Review: With its beautiful gardens, arcades filled with shops and cafes, and the stunning Palais-Royal itself, this hidden gem offers a peaceful escape from the bustling city.

When to Go: Visit during the spring or summer months to enjoy the gardens in full bloom and to experience outdoor events and performances.

How to Go: Located in the 1st arrondissement, Domaine National du Palais-Royal is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the gardens, explore the arcades filled with boutiques and galleries, admire the Palais-Royal architecture, and relax in one of the cafes.

Free or Paid: Admission to Domaine National du Palais-Royal is free.

Pont Neuf, Paris

Overview: Pont Neuf is the oldest standing bridge across the Seine River in Paris, renowned for its elegant design, panoramic views, and historical significance.

History: Constructed in the late 16th century under the reign of Henry IV, Pont Neuf has survived revolutions, wars, and floods, earning its status as a Parisian landmark.

Since When: Pont Neuf has spanned the Seine River and connected the Île de la Cité with both banks since its completion in 1607.

Review: With its iconic arches, ornate decorations, and prime location in the heart of Paris, Pont Neuf offers a picturesque backdrop for leisurely walks and sightseeing.

When to Go: Anytime is ideal for crossing Pont Neuf, though sunset offers particularly stunning views of the Seine and surrounding landmarks.

How to Go: As one of the central bridges in Paris, Pont Neuf is easily accessible by foot, public transport, or boat cruises along the Seine.

What to Do: Walk across the bridge to enjoy panoramic views of the Seine and nearby landmarks, take photos of its statues and sculptures, and explore the Île de la Cité.

Free or Paid: Access to Pont Neuf is free.

Grand Rex, Paris

Overview: Grand Rex is an iconic cinema and entertainment venue in Paris, known for its Art Deco architecture, giant screen, and immersive movie experiences.

History: Opened in 1932, Grand Rex was once the largest cinema in Europe and remains a symbol of Parisian cinema culture, hosting film premieres, concerts, and events.

Since When: Grand Rex has been entertaining audiences with its larger-than-life screenings and performances since its inauguration in 1932.

Review: With its majestic auditorium, atmospheric lighting, and state-of-the-art sound system, Grand Rex offers a unique and immersive cinema experience for movie enthusiasts.

When to Go: Catch a film screening or special event at Grand Rex for an unforgettable cinematic experience, or join one of the guided tours to learn about its history and architecture.

How to Go: Located in the 2nd arrondissement, Grand Rex is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Watch a movie on the giant screen, attend a live concert or performance, join a guided tour to explore behind the scenes, and marvel at the Art Deco interiors.

Free or Paid: Admission to Grand Rex varies depending on the event or screening, with tickets available for purchase.

Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris

Overview: Musée de l’Orangerie is an art museum in Paris, famous for its collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterpieces, including Claude Monet’s Water Lilies series.

History: Originally built as a greenhouse for orange trees in the Tuileries Garden, Musée de l’Orangerie was converted into an art museum in the 1920s to showcase Monet’s Water Lilies.

Since When: Musée de l’Orangerie has been exhibiting some of the finest works of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art since its transformation in 1927.

Review: With its intimate galleries and breathtaking display of Monet’s Water Lilies, Musée de l’Orangerie offers a tranquil and immersive art experience in the heart of Paris.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully appreciate the serenity of Monet’s masterpieces.

How to Go: Situated in the Tuileries Garden near the Place de la Concorde, Musée de l’Orangerie is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Admire Monet’s Water Lilies in the specially designed oval rooms, explore other Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works in the museum’s collection, and enjoy the peaceful ambiance of the galleries.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée de l’Orangerie requires paid tickets, though it is included in the Paris Museum Pass.

Musée de l’Orangerie, Paris

Overview: Musée de l’Orangerie is an art museum in Paris, renowned for its collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works, particularly Claude Monet’s Water Lilies series.

History: Originally constructed as a greenhouse for orange trees in the Tuileries Garden, Musée de l’Orangerie was repurposed into an art gallery in the 1920s to house Monet’s Water Lilies.

Since When: Musée de l’Orangerie has been showcasing Monet’s iconic Water Lilies and other significant works of art since its inauguration in 1927.

Review: Offering a serene environment and unparalleled views of Monet’s masterpiece, Musée de l’Orangerie provides a captivating journey through the world of Impressionism.

When to Go: Plan your visit during weekdays or early mornings to enjoy the museum’s tranquility and appreciate the details of the artworks.

How to Go: Conveniently located near the Place de la Concorde in the Tuileries Garden, Musée de l’Orangerie is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at Monet’s Water Lilies in the oval rooms designed specifically to showcase them, explore the museum’s other collections of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art, and soak in the beauty of the surrounding garden.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée de l’Orangerie requires paid tickets, though it is covered by the Paris Museum Pass.

Petit Palais, Paris

Overview: Petit Palais is a stunning museum in Paris, housing an extensive collection of fine arts, sculptures, and artifacts within a beautiful Beaux-Arts building.

History: Built for the 1900 Exposition Universelle, Petit Palais was designed as a showcase of French art and craftsmanship, and later transformed into a museum to house the City of Paris’s fine arts collection.

Since When: Petit Palais has been enchanting visitors with its exquisite artworks and architecture since it opened its doors to the public in 1902.

Review: With its impressive collection spanning from antiquity to the early 20th century, Petit Palais offers a comprehensive journey through the history of art in a majestic setting.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully appreciate the museum’s masterpieces.

How to Go: Situated near the Champs-Élysées in the 8th arrondissement, Petit Palais is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s diverse collections of paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts, admire the grand architecture and beautiful courtyard, and attend temporary exhibitions and cultural events.

Free or Paid: Admission to Petit Palais is free for the permanent collections, though some temporary exhibitions may require paid tickets.

Jardin d’Acclimatation, Paris

Overview: Jardin d’Acclimatation is a charming amusement park and botanical garden in Paris, offering a blend of family-friendly attractions and natural beauty.

History: Founded in 1860 by Napoleon III and Empress Eugénie, Jardin d’Acclimatation was originally a zoo and botanical garden created to introduce exotic plants and animals to the public.

Since When: Jardin d’Acclimatation has been delighting visitors with its attractions and greenery for over 160 years, making it one of the oldest amusement parks in the world.

Review: With its mix of rides, games, animal encounters, and lush landscapes, Jardin d’Acclimatation provides a delightful escape for families and nature lovers alike.

When to Go: Visit during the spring or summer months to enjoy outdoor activities, rides, and picnics amidst the park’s blooming flowers and trees.

How to Go: Located in the Bois de Boulogne in the 16th arrondissement, Jardin d’Acclimatation is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the park’s various attractions, including rides, playgrounds, animal enclosures, and themed gardens, and relax amidst the natural beauty of its landscaped grounds.

Free or Paid: Admission to Jardin d’Acclimatation requires paid tickets, though there may be free entry to certain areas.

Musée Rodin, Paris

Overview: Musée Rodin is a museum in Paris dedicated to the works of the renowned French sculptor Auguste Rodin, housed in a beautiful mansion surrounded by gardens.

History: Founded in 1919, Musée Rodin occupies the Hôtel Biron, which was once Rodin’s residence and studio, and showcases his iconic sculptures, including The Thinker and The Kiss.

Since When: Musée Rodin has been showcasing Rodin’s masterpieces and preserving his legacy since it opened to the public in 1919.

Review: With its impressive collection of sculptures set amidst tranquil gardens, Musée Rodin offers a serene and immersive art experience in the heart of Paris.

When to Go: Visit during the spring or summer to explore the outdoor sculpture garden and enjoy the blooms, or in the fall to admire the changing colors of the foliage.

How to Go: Located in the 7th arrondissement, Musée Rodin is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Marvel at Rodin’s sculptures, stroll through the museum’s indoor galleries and outdoor gardens, and admire the architecture of the Hôtel Biron.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée Rodin requires paid tickets, though entry to the garden is free.

Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, Paris

Overview: Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac is a museum in Paris dedicated to the arts and cultures of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas, housed in a striking contemporary building.

History: Established in 2006, Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac was designed to showcase the extensive ethnographic collections of the French government and promote cross-cultural understanding.

Since When: Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac has been enriching visitors with its diverse collections and exhibitions since it opened its doors in 2006.

Review: With its thought-provoking displays, immersive exhibitions, and innovative architecture, Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac offers a fascinating exploration of global cultures.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or off-peak hours to fully immerse yourself in the museum’s collections without the crowds.

How to Go: Located near the Eiffel Tower in the 7th arrondissement, Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s permanent and temporary exhibitions, attend cultural events and performances, and admire the unique architectural design of the building.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée du quai Branly – Jacques Chirac requires paid tickets, though there may be free entry on certain occasions or for specific exhibitions.

Pont des Arts, Paris

Overview: Pont des Arts, also known as the “Bridge of Love,” is a pedestrian bridge in Paris famous for its romantic ambiance and iconic padlocks.

History: Built in the early 19th century during the reign of Napoleon I, Pont des Arts originally served as a link between the Louvre Palace and the Institut de France.

Since When: Pont des Arts has been a beloved spot for lovers and tourists to enjoy scenic views of the Seine River since its completion in 1804.

Review: With its panoramic views of the Seine and the surrounding landmarks, Pont des Arts offers a romantic setting for leisurely walks and unforgettable moments.

When to Go: Visit during sunset for breathtaking views and a magical atmosphere, though it can get crowded with tourists during peak times.

How to Go: Situated in the heart of Paris, Pont des Arts is easily accessible by foot from nearby attractions or via public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a romantic stroll across the bridge, admire the padlocks left by couples as symbols of eternal love, and enjoy the picturesque views of the Seine River and the Paris skyline.

Free or Paid: Admission to Pont des Arts is free.

Paris Zoological Park, Paris

Overview: Paris Zoological Park, also known as Zoo de Vincennes, is a modern zoo in Paris known for its spacious habitats and conservation efforts.

History: Founded in 1934, Paris Zoological Park underwent extensive renovations and reopened in 2014 with a focus on creating naturalistic environments for its animal residents.

Since When: Paris Zoological Park has been providing visitors with educational experiences and wildlife conservation initiatives for over 80 years.

Review: With its immersive habitats, diverse animal species, and commitment to conservation, Paris Zoological Park offers an engaging and educational experience for visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Visit during the morning hours when animals are most active, and consider weekdays for fewer crowds.

How to Go: Located in the Bois de Vincennes in the 12th arrondissement, Paris Zoological Park is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the various themed areas of the zoo, attend feeding sessions and educational talks, and learn about conservation efforts to protect endangered species.

Free or Paid: Admission to Paris Zoological Park requires paid tickets.

Parc Montsouris, Paris

Overview: Parc Montsouris is a picturesque park in Paris’s 14th arrondissement, featuring lush greenery, a tranquil lake, and scenic walking paths.

History: Designed by landscape architect Adolphe Alphand in the late 19th century, Parc Montsouris was created as part of Baron Haussmann’s urban renovation projects in Paris.

Since When: Parc Montsouris has been delighting visitors with its natural beauty and recreational opportunities since its opening in 1869.

Review: With its peaceful ambiance, well-maintained grounds, and diverse flora and fauna, Parc Montsouris offers a serene retreat from the city bustle.

When to Go: Visit during the spring to see the park’s flowers in bloom, or in the fall for vibrant foliage colors.

How to Go: Situated in the 14th arrondissement, Parc Montsouris is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll around the lake, relax on the grassy lawns, have a picnic with friends or family, and enjoy the views of the park’s picturesque landscapes.

Free or Paid: Admission to Parc Montsouris is free.

Square Jean XXIII, Paris

Overview: Square Jean XXIII is a charming garden located behind Notre-Dame Cathedral, offering a peaceful retreat with views of the iconic church.

History: Named after Pope John XXIII, Square Jean XXIII was created in the mid-20th century as part of the renovation efforts around Notre-Dame Cathedral.

Since When: Square Jean XXIII has been providing visitors with a serene green space since its inauguration in the 1950s.

Review: With its tranquil atmosphere and close proximity to Notre-Dame, Square Jean XXIII offers a serene escape from the bustling city, ideal for relaxation and contemplation.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings for a quiet experience and to enjoy the views of Notre-Dame without the crowds.

How to Go: Situated on the Île de la Cité, Square Jean XXIII is easily accessible by foot from nearby attractions or via public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the garden, admire the views of Notre-Dame Cathedral, and relax on one of the benches surrounded by greenery.

Free or Paid: Admission to Square Jean XXIII is free.

Place du Tertre, Paris

Overview: Place du Tertre is a lively square in Montmartre known for its bustling atmosphere, outdoor cafes, and artists’ studios.

History: Once a gathering place for artists such as Picasso and Van Gogh in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Place du Tertre has long been associated with bohemian culture and creativity.

Since When: Place du Tertre has been a hub for artists, tourists, and locals alike for over a century, drawing visitors with its vibrant energy and charming ambiance.

Review: With its lively street performances, open-air cafes, and local artists showcasing their work, Place du Tertre offers a quintessentially Parisian experience in the heart of Montmartre.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to experience the square’s bustling atmosphere and interact with the artists, or in the evening for a more relaxed vibe.

How to Go: Located in the Montmartre district, Place du Tertre is easily accessible by foot from nearby attractions or via public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the square’s cobblestone streets lined with artists’ stalls, have a meal or drink at one of the outdoor cafes, and consider having your portrait drawn by a local artist.

Free or Paid: Admission to Place du Tertre is free, though purchasing artwork or food and drinks may incur costs.

Aquarium de Paris, Paris

Overview: Aquarium de Paris, also known as Cinéaqua, is a modern aquarium located near the Eiffel Tower, featuring a diverse array of marine life and interactive exhibits.

History: Opened in 2006, Aquarium de Paris was designed to provide visitors with an immersive underwater experience and promote marine conservation awareness.

Since When: Aquarium de Paris has been captivating visitors with its underwater wonders and educational programs since its inauguration in 2006.

Review: With its impressive collection of marine species, engaging activities for all ages, and innovative exhibits, Aquarium de Paris offers an entertaining and educational experience for families and marine enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or off-peak hours to avoid crowds and fully enjoy the aquarium’s attractions.

How to Go: Situated near the Trocadéro Gardens in the 16th arrondissement, Aquarium de Paris is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the various themed zones of the aquarium, attend feeding sessions and educational talks, and participate in interactive experiences such as touch pools and virtual reality simulations.

Free or Paid: Admission to Aquarium de Paris requires paid tickets.

Wall of Love, Paris

Overview: The Wall of Love, located in Montmartre, Paris, is a vibrant mural featuring the phrase “I love you” in over 250 languages, symbolizing love and unity.

History: Created by artists Frédéric Baron and Claire Kito in 2000, the Wall of Love was inspired by the idea of spreading love and celebrating diversity in the city of Paris.

Since When: The Wall of Love has been a beloved landmark in Montmartre since its unveiling in 2000.

Review: With its colorful tiles and universal message of love, the Wall of Love serves as a charming backdrop for romantic moments and heartfelt photos.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to admire the mural and read the different expressions of love, or in the evening for a romantic stroll in Montmartre.

How to Go: Situated in the Jehan Rictus garden square in Montmartre, the Wall of Love is easily accessible by foot from nearby attractions or via public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take photos in front of the mural, read the “I love you” messages in various languages, and explore the charming neighborhood of Montmartre.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Wall of Love is free.

Gallery of Evolution, Paris

Overview: The Gallery of Evolution is a captivating natural history museum located in the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, showcasing the diversity of life on Earth through immersive exhibits and displays.

History: Established in 1889, the Gallery of Evolution was originally part of the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle and underwent extensive renovations in the late 20th century to create its modern exhibition space.

Since When: The Gallery of Evolution has been educating visitors about the wonders of the natural world for over a century, welcoming guests since its opening in 1889.

Review: With its stunning architecture, lifelike dioramas, and interactive exhibits, the Gallery of Evolution offers an engaging and educational experience for visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully immerse yourself in the museum’s exhibits.

How to Go: Located in the Jardin des Plantes in the 5th arrondissement, the Gallery of Evolution is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s diverse collections of specimens, marvel at the lifelike dioramas depicting ecosystems from around the world, and participate in interactive activities and workshops.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Gallery of Evolution requires paid tickets, though there may be free entry for certain groups or on specific days.

Le Marais, Paris

Overview: Le Marais is a historic district in Paris known for its cobblestone streets, medieval architecture, trendy boutiques, and vibrant LGBTQ+ scene.

History: Once a marshland outside the city walls, Le Marais has evolved over the centuries into a fashionable and diverse neighborhood, home to aristocrats, artisans, and immigrants.

Since When: Le Marais has been a thriving cultural hub in Paris since the Middle Ages, with its vibrant atmosphere attracting visitors and residents alike for centuries.

Review: With its mix of historic charm, trendy shops, art galleries, and bustling cafes, Le Marais offers a dynamic and eclectic experience in the heart of Paris.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to explore the neighborhood’s boutiques, museums, and cafes, or in the evening for a lively atmosphere and nightlife.

How to Go: Situated in the 3rd and 4th arrondissements, Le Marais is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Wander through the narrow streets, discover hidden courtyards and historical landmarks, shop at trendy boutiques, and indulge in delicious food and drinks at local cafes and restaurants.

Free or Paid: Admission to Le Marais is free, though individual attractions or activities may require payment.

Grande Mosquée de Paris, Paris

Overview: Grande Mosquée de Paris is a stunning Islamic architectural marvel in Paris, featuring intricate tilework, lush gardens, and a tranquil courtyard.

History: Built in the 1920s as a token of gratitude to Muslim soldiers who fought for France during World War I, Grande Mosquée de Paris is a symbol of Franco-Islamic friendship and cultural exchange.

Since When: Grande Mosquée de Paris has been serving as a spiritual and cultural center for the Muslim community and a tourist attraction since its completion in 1926.

Review: With its beautiful architecture, serene ambiance, and traditional Moroccan tea house, Grande Mosquée de Paris offers a unique cultural experience in the heart of the city.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays for a quieter experience, or on Fridays to witness the congregational prayers and immerse yourself in the mosque’s atmosphere.

How to Go: Located in the Latin Quarter of the 5th arrondissement, Grande Mosquée de Paris is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the mosque’s stunning architecture, admire the tilework and calligraphy, relax in the peaceful courtyard or garden, and enjoy traditional mint tea in the tea house.

Free or Paid: Admission to Grande Mosquée de Paris is free, though donations are appreciated.

Montparnasse Tower, Paris

Overview: Montparnasse Tower is a skyscraper in Paris offering breathtaking panoramic views of the city from its observation deck on the 56th floor.

History: Constructed in the 1970s, Montparnasse Tower was initially met with controversy due to its modernist design, but it has since become a prominent landmark in the Parisian skyline.

Since When: Montparnasse Tower has been providing visitors with stunning views of Paris since its opening to the public in 1973.

Review: With its unparalleled views of iconic landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and Notre-Dame Cathedral, Montparnasse Tower offers a memorable experience for visitors seeking panoramic vistas of the city.

When to Go: Visit during clear weather for the best visibility and photo opportunities, and consider going during sunset to witness Paris illuminated by the golden hour.

How to Go: Situated in the Montparnasse area of the 14th arrondissement, Montparnasse Tower is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take the elevator to the observation deck, marvel at the 360-degree views of Paris, use the telescopes to spot landmarks, and capture stunning photos of the cityscape.

Free or Paid: Admission to Montparnasse Tower’s observation deck requires paid tickets.

Musée National Picasso-Paris, Paris

Overview: Musée National Picasso-Paris is a world-renowned museum dedicated to the life and work of the iconic Spanish artist Pablo Picasso, housed in a historic mansion in the Marais district.

History: Established in 1985, Musée National Picasso-Paris was created to showcase the extensive collection of Picasso’s artworks donated by his heirs to the French government as payment for estate taxes.

Since When: Musée National Picasso-Paris has been celebrating Picasso’s artistic legacy and influence since its inauguration in 1985.

Review: With its comprehensive collection of Picasso’s paintings, sculptures, drawings, and ceramics, Musée National Picasso-Paris offers a fascinating journey through the artist’s prolific career and creative genius.

When to Go: Visit during weekdays or early mornings to avoid crowds and fully appreciate the museum’s artworks without interruptions.

How to Go: Located in the Marais district of the 3rd arrondissement, Musée National Picasso-Paris is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s diverse collection of Picasso’s masterpieces, learn about the artist’s life and influences, and admire the beautiful architecture of the Hôtel Salé.

Free or Paid: Admission to Musée National Picasso-Paris requires paid tickets.

Moulin Rouge, Paris

Overview: Moulin Rouge is a world-famous cabaret in Paris known for its spectacular shows, extravagant costumes, and iconic red windmill.

History: Established in 1889 by Joseph Oller and Charles Zidler, Moulin Rouge quickly became a symbol of bohemian Parisian nightlife and entertainment.

Since When: Moulin Rouge has been entertaining audiences with its dazzling performances for over a century, since its grand opening in 1889.

Review: With its dazzling choreography, talented performers, and lavish sets, Moulin Rouge offers an unforgettable and glamorous evening of entertainment.

When to Go: Visit in the evening to experience the full splendor of the cabaret’s shows and performances.

How to Go: Located in the Pigalle district of the 18th arrondissement, Moulin Rouge is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Enjoy a dinner and show experience, immerse yourself in the cabaret’s vibrant atmosphere, and marvel at the breathtaking performances.

Free or Paid: Admission to Moulin Rouge requires paid tickets.

La Ménagerie, le zoo du Jardin des Plantes, Paris

Overview: La Ménagerie, le zoo du Jardin des Plantes, is a historic zoo in Paris, located within the Jardin des Plantes botanical garden, and home to a diverse array of animal species.

History: Established in 1794, La Ménagerie is one of the oldest zoos in the world and was originally founded as a menagerie for the royal family.

Since When: La Ménagerie has been providing visitors with the opportunity to observe and learn about wildlife for over two centuries, since its founding in 1794.

Review: With its historic charm, well-maintained habitats, and educational programs, La Ménagerie offers a delightful and enriching experience for visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to observe the animals when they are most active, and consider weekdays for fewer crowds.

How to Go: Located in the 5th arrondissement, La Ménagerie is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the zoo’s various exhibits, learn about conservation efforts, and observe the diverse collection of animals, including big cats, primates, and reptiles.

Free or Paid: Admission to La Ménagerie requires paid tickets.

Trocadéro Square, Paris

Overview: Trocadéro Square, also known as Place du Trocadéro, is a large public square in Paris offering stunning views of the Eiffel Tower and the Champ de Mars.

History: Constructed for the 1937 World’s Fair, Trocadéro Square was designed to showcase the Palais de Chaillot and provide a grand entrance to the exhibition grounds.

Since When: Trocadéro Square has been a popular gathering place and tourist attraction since its creation for the 1937 World’s Fair.

Review: With its panoramic views, majestic fountains, and impressive architecture, Trocadéro Square offers a picturesque setting for enjoying the iconic sights of Paris.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime for optimal photo opportunities and to admire the Eiffel Tower against the backdrop of the square.

How to Go: Located in the 16th arrondissement, Trocadéro Square is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Take photos with the Eiffel Tower in the background, relax by the fountains, and enjoy the vibrant atmosphere of this iconic Parisian square.

Free or Paid: Admission to Trocadéro Square is free.

Palais de Tokyo, Paris

Overview: Palais de Tokyo is a contemporary art museum in Paris known for its innovative exhibitions, avant-garde installations, and dynamic artistic programming.

History: Originally built for the 1937 World’s Fair, Palais de Tokyo was repurposed as a contemporary art center in 2002, becoming one of the largest venues for modern art in Europe.

Since When: Palais de Tokyo has been showcasing cutting-edge contemporary art since its reopening as an art center in 2002.

Review: With its sprawling exhibition spaces, diverse range of artworks, and emphasis on experimentation and creativity, Palais de Tokyo offers a refreshing and immersive experience for art enthusiasts.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to explore the exhibitions at your own pace, or in the evening for special events and performances.

How to Go: Located in the 16th arrondissement, Palais de Tokyo is easily accessible by public transport, including the Paris Metro and buses.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s ever-changing exhibitions, attend artist talks and workshops, and enjoy the panoramic views of the Seine River from its terrace.

Free or Paid: Admission to Palais de Tokyo varies depending on exhibitions, with some areas offering free entry and others requiring paid tickets.

External links

32 Best Things to Do in Paris, France
42 Best Things to Do in Paris, According to Experts
Do’s and don’ts in Paris : r/ParisTravelGuide
First Time Guide to Paris
THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Paris
The 50 best things to do in Paris right now
The absolute must-do/see in Paris? : r/ParisTravelGuide
THE TOP 15 Things To Do in Paris


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