Things to See in Rome

by NeemTime.com Editors
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Things to See in Rome

Things to See in Rome: Based on NeemTime research from most popular to just popular.

Trevi Fountain, Rome

Overview: Trevi Fountain is a stunning Baroque fountain located in the heart of Rome, famous for its intricate design and impressive sculptures.

History: The fountain was designed by Nicola Salvi and completed in 1762, representing Oceanus, the god of all water.

Since When: The construction of Trevi Fountain began in 1732 and was completed in 1762.

Review: Trevi Fountain is a must-see landmark, particularly enchanting at night when it is beautifully illuminated.

When to Go: The best time to visit is early in the morning or late at night to avoid the large crowds.

How to Go: Trevi Fountain is accessible by a short walk from the Barberini metro station or numerous bus lines stopping nearby.

What to Do: Toss a coin into the fountain to ensure your return to Rome, and admire the exquisite artistry of the sculptures.

Free or Paid: Free

Colosseum, Rome

Overview: The Colosseum is an ancient amphitheater in Rome, renowned for its massive size and historical significance.

History: Constructed between 72 AD and 80 AD, the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles.

Since When: The Colosseum has stood since its completion in 80 AD under Emperor Titus.

Review: Visiting the Colosseum offers a fascinating glimpse into ancient Roman life and architecture, making it a highlight of any trip to Rome.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid peak tourist hours.

How to Go: The Colosseum is easily accessible via the Colosseo metro station on Line B.

What to Do: Explore the Colosseum’s interior, including the arena floor and underground passages, and visit the nearby Roman Forum and Palatine Hill.

Free or Paid: Paid

Pantheon, Rome

Overview: The Pantheon is an ancient Roman temple, now a church, known for its remarkable dome and oculus.

History: Originally built as a temple to all gods around 126 AD during Emperor Hadrian’s reign, the Pantheon has been a Christian church since the 7th century.

Since When: The Pantheon has been in continuous use since its construction in the 2nd century AD.

Review: The Pantheon is a marvel of ancient engineering and architecture, with its well-preserved interior and iconic dome.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the busiest times.

How to Go: The Pantheon is located in the center of Rome, within walking distance from Piazza Navona and the Trevi Fountain.

What to Do: Admire the Pantheon’s grand architecture, including the oculus that lets in natural light, and explore the tombs of historical figures such as Raphael.

Free or Paid: Free

Piazza Navona, Rome

Overview: Piazza Navona is a lively and picturesque square in Rome, known for its Baroque architecture and vibrant atmosphere.

History: Built on the site of the ancient Stadium of Domitian, the square was transformed in the 17th century with the addition of Baroque fountains and buildings.

Since When: Piazza Navona has been a central hub in Rome since the 1st century AD, with its current form dating back to the 17th century.

Review: Piazza Navona is a must-visit for its beautiful fountains, bustling cafes, and street performances, offering a perfect blend of history and modern life.

When to Go: The best time to visit is in the evening when the square comes alive with lights and activities.

How to Go: Piazza Navona is easily accessible by bus or a short walk from the Pantheon.

What to Do: Enjoy the stunning Fountain of the Four Rivers, relax at an outdoor cafe, and explore the surrounding Baroque architecture.

Free or Paid: Free

Vatican Museums, Rome

Overview: The Vatican Museums house an extensive collection of art and historical artifacts amassed by the Catholic Church over centuries.

History: Established in the early 16th century by Pope Julius II, the museums include masterpieces from the Renaissance and ancient Roman and Egyptian artifacts.

Since When: The Vatican Museums were founded in 1506.

Review: A visit to the Vatican Museums is a breathtaking journey through art history, culminating in the awe-inspiring Sistine Chapel.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the largest crowds.

How to Go: The Vatican Museums are accessible via the Ottaviano-S. Pietro metro station or various bus routes.

What to Do: Explore the extensive galleries, admire Michelangelo’s ceiling in the Sistine Chapel, and visit the Raphael Rooms.

Free or Paid: Paid

St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome

Overview: St. Peter’s Basilica is one of the largest and most important churches in the world, renowned for its Renaissance architecture and historical significance.

History: Built over the burial site of Saint Peter, the basilica’s construction began in 1506 and was completed in 1626, designed by prominent architects including Michelangelo.

Since When: St. Peter’s Basilica was consecrated in 1626.

Review: St. Peter’s Basilica offers a spiritual and architectural experience, with its grandiose interior, famous dome, and significant artworks.

When to Go: Early morning or late afternoon visits are best to avoid the heaviest crowds.

How to Go: The basilica is accessible via the Ottaviano-S. Pietro metro station or several bus lines.

What to Do: Climb to the top of the dome for a panoramic view of Rome, visit the Vatican Grottoes, and admire the Pietà by Michelangelo.

Free or Paid: Free (dome climb is paid)

Piazza di Spagna, Rome

Overview: Piazza di Spagna is a famous square in Rome known for the Spanish Steps and the Barcaccia Fountain.

History: The square and its steps were named after the Spanish Embassy, and the steps were built between 1723 and 1725 to link the Spanish Embassy to the Trinità dei Monti church.

Since When: The Spanish Steps have been a prominent feature since their completion in 1725.

Review: Piazza di Spagna is a lively and picturesque spot, ideal for people-watching and capturing iconic photos of Rome.

When to Go: The best time to visit is in the early morning or evening to avoid peak tourist crowds.

How to Go: The square is accessible via the Spagna metro station.

What to Do: Climb the Spanish Steps, enjoy the view from the top, and explore the nearby upscale shopping streets.

Free or Paid: Free

Roman Forum, Rome

Overview: The Roman Forum is an ancient site that was the center of Roman public life, filled with ruins of important government buildings and temples.

History: Once the heart of ancient Rome, the forum served as a public area for markets, elections, and gladiatorial combats, evolving over centuries starting from the 7th century BC.

Since When: The Roman Forum dates back to the 7th century BC.

Review: Visiting the Roman Forum is a fascinating experience, offering a glimpse into the daily life and grandeur of ancient Rome.

When to Go: Early morning visits are best to explore the ruins in cooler temperatures and with fewer tourists.

How to Go: The Roman Forum is accessible via the Colosseo metro station.

What to Do: Explore the ancient ruins, including the Temple of Saturn, the Arch of Titus, and the House of the Vestals.

Free or Paid: Paid

Piazza del Popolo, Rome

Overview: Piazza del Popolo is a large, elegant square in Rome, known for its twin churches, obelisk, and impressive fountains.

History: Originally the site of a northern gate in the Aurelian Walls, it became a major public space in the 19th century, designed by architect Giuseppe Valadier.

Since When: The current design of Piazza del Popolo dates back to the early 19th century.

Review: The square is a bustling and picturesque area that offers a blend of historical architecture and modern-day vibrancy.

When to Go: Visit during the day to fully appreciate the architecture and at sunset for a beautiful view from the Pincio Terrace.

How to Go: Accessible via the Flaminio metro station or several bus lines.

What to Do: Explore the twin churches, admire the central obelisk, and relax by the fountains.

Free or Paid: Free

Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome

Overview: Castel Sant’Angelo is a historic fortress and museum located on the banks of the Tiber River.

History: Originally built as Emperor Hadrian’s mausoleum in 135 AD, it has served variously as a fortress, papal residence, and prison.

Since When: The structure was completed in 139 AD and has been a museum since 1901.

Review: Visiting Castel Sant’Angelo provides a fascinating insight into Rome’s history, with its well-preserved interiors and panoramic views of the city.

When to Go: Early morning or late afternoon to avoid the peak tourist crowds.

How to Go: Accessible via the Lepanto or Ottaviano metro stations, followed by a short walk.

What to Do: Explore the museum’s exhibits, walk through the historical rooms, and enjoy the view from the terrace.

Free or Paid: Paid

Villa Borghese, Rome

Overview: Villa Borghese is a large public park in Rome, offering lush gardens, museums, and recreational areas.

History: The park was developed in the early 17th century by Cardinal Scipione Borghese as a country villa with extensive gardens.

Since When: The gardens have been public since 1903.

Review: Villa Borghese is a serene escape from the city’s hustle, perfect for leisurely walks, picnics, and cultural visits to its museums.

When to Go: Any time of year, with spring and autumn offering the most pleasant weather for outdoor activities.

How to Go: Accessible via the Spagna or Flaminio metro stations.

What to Do: Visit the Borghese Gallery, rent a bike or rowboat, and enjoy the park’s sculptures and fountains.

Free or Paid: Free (museum visits are paid)

Sistine Chapel, Rome

Overview: The Sistine Chapel is a renowned chapel in the Vatican, famous for Michelangelo’s ceiling and Last Judgment frescoes.

History: Built in the late 15th century by Pope Sixtus IV, it is the site of papal conclaves and other significant ceremonies.

Since When: The Sistine Chapel has been in use since 1483.

Review: The chapel is a must-visit for its extraordinary art and historical significance, offering a deeply moving experience.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning to avoid the largest crowds.

How to Go: Accessible via the Ottaviano-S. Pietro metro station or various bus routes to the Vatican Museums.

What to Do: Admire Michelangelo’s frescoes, including The Creation of Adam and The Last Judgment.

Free or Paid: Paid (part of Vatican Museums entry)

Spanish Steps, Rome

Overview: The Spanish Steps are a famous staircase in Rome, connecting Piazza di Spagna with Piazza Trinità dei Monti, adorned with numerous terraces and the iconic Barcaccia Fountain.

History: Built in the 18th century to link the Bourbon Spanish Embassy with the Holy See, the steps have become a beloved meeting point and cultural landmark.

Since When: Completed in 1725, the Spanish Steps have been a popular attraction for centuries.

Review: The Spanish Steps offer a charming spot to rest and people-watch, especially during the spring when the azaleas are in bloom, although they can be crowded with tourists.

When to Go: Visit early morning or late evening for a more serene experience.

How to Go: Accessible via the Spagna metro station or various bus routes.

What to Do: Climb the steps for a view of the city, visit the nearby Keats-Shelley House, and enjoy the lively atmosphere of Piazza di Spagna.

Free or Paid: Free

Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, Rome

Overview: The Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, also known as the Altar of the Fatherland, is a grandiose monument honoring the first king of a unified Italy, located in Piazza Venezia.

History: Built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it was intended to commemorate Italian unification and honor Victor Emmanuel II’s role in the process.

Since When: Construction began in 1885 and was completed in 1925.

Review: The monument’s imposing architecture and expansive views from the terrace make it a noteworthy stop, though some criticize its scale and impact on the surrounding historic area.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid the heat and crowds.

How to Go: Accessible via various bus routes or a short walk from the Colosseum.

What to Do: Ascend to the terrace for panoramic views of Rome and explore the museum inside the monument.

Free or Paid: Free (museum entry may be paid)

Campo de’ Fiori, Rome

Overview: Campo de’ Fiori is a vibrant square in the heart of Rome, known for its bustling daily market and lively atmosphere.

History: Originally a meadow, it became a market square in the Middle Ages and has since been a hub of commercial and social activity.

Since When: Campo de’ Fiori has been a market square since the Middle Ages, with its market continuing to this day.

Review: The square offers a glimpse of authentic Roman life, with its market stalls, cafes, and street performers, making it a great place to experience local culture.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to experience the bustling market and in the evening for a lively atmosphere.

How to Go: Accessible via various bus routes or a short walk from Piazza Navona.

What to Do: Explore the market stalls selling fresh produce, flowers, and souvenirs, and enjoy a drink or meal at one of the surrounding cafes.

Free or Paid: Free

Piazza Venezia, Rome

Overview: Piazza Venezia is a major square in Rome, known for its central location, monumental architecture, and the imposing Altar of the Fatherland.

History: Originally a medieval marketplace, it became a ceremonial center during the Renaissance and has since been the site of various important events in Italian history.

Since When: Piazza Venezia has been a significant square since the Middle Ages, with its current layout dating back to the late 19th century.

Review: The square’s grandeur and historical significance make it a must-see, though traffic congestion detracts somewhat from its appeal.

When to Go: Visit early in the morning or late in the evening to avoid the crowds and traffic.

How to Go: Accessible via various bus routes and a short walk from the Colosseum or the Pantheon.

What to Do: Admire the Altar of the Fatherland, visit the Capitoline Museums, and enjoy the views of the Roman Forum.

Free or Paid: Free

Circus Maximus, Rome

Overview: Circus Maximus is an ancient Roman chariot racing stadium and mass entertainment venue, now a public park surrounded by the ruins of ancient Rome.

History: Dating back to the 6th century BCE, Circus Maximus was the largest stadium in ancient Rome, capable of holding up to 150,000 spectators for chariot races and other events.

Since When: The site has been in use since the Roman Kingdom era and continued to be a center for entertainment and public gatherings throughout the Roman Empire.

Review: While the original grandeur of the stadium is no longer intact, Circus Maximus offers a tranquil green space for picnics and leisure activities amidst historic ruins.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and enjoy the peaceful ambiance.

How to Go: Easily accessible via public transportation, including metro, bus, or a pleasant walk from nearby attractions.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll around the park, explore the archaeological remains, and enjoy panoramic views of the Palatine Hill and Roman Forum.

Free or Paid: Free

Basilica Papale di Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome

Overview: Basilica Papale di Santa Maria Maggiore, also known as the Papal Basilica of Saint Mary Major, is one of the four major basilicas in Rome, renowned for its stunning architecture and religious significance.

History: Founded in the 4th century by Pope Liberius, the basilica is believed to be one of the oldest churches dedicated to the Virgin Mary in the Western world.

Since When: The current basilica was rebuilt in the 5th century and has undergone various renovations and expansions over the centuries.

Review: A masterpiece of Romanesque and Baroque architecture, Santa Maria Maggiore impresses visitors with its grandeur, intricate mosaics, and rich history.

When to Go: Visit during the morning or late afternoon to experience the basilica’s beauty in natural light and avoid crowds.

How to Go: Easily accessible by public transportation, including metro and bus, or a pleasant walk from nearby attractions.

What to Do: Marvel at the magnificent mosaics, admire the ornate interior, and explore the basilica’s chapels and crypt.

Free or Paid: Free (donations welcome)

Largo di Torre Argentina, Rome

Overview: Largo di Torre Argentina is a square in Rome housing the remains of four Roman temples and the site where Julius Caesar was assassinated.

History: The temples date back to the Republican era, while the area gained historical significance following Caesar’s assassination in 44 BCE.

Since When: The temples were constructed in the 3rd to 1st centuries BCE, and the site of Caesar’s assassination has been preserved as a historical landmark.

Review: A hidden gem of ancient Rome, Largo di Torre Argentina offers a unique blend of archaeological ruins and a sanctuary for stray cats.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to explore the ruins and witness the playful activities of the resident cat colony.

How to Go: Accessible via public transportation, including tram and bus, or a short walk from nearby attractions.

What to Do: Explore the ancient ruins, learn about the site’s history, and spend time with the friendly feline inhabitants.

Free or Paid: Free

Parco della Mole Adriana, Rome

Overview: Parco della Mole Adriana, also known as Monte Mario Park, is a sprawling green space atop Monte Mario hill, offering panoramic views of Rome and the Vatican City.

History: The park is situated on the site of the ancient Mons Vaticanus and has been a recreational area since ancient times.

Since When: The park has been open to the public for centuries, providing locals and visitors with a tranquil retreat from the bustling city below.

Review: A peaceful oasis away from the tourist crowds, Parco della Mole Adriana is perfect for leisurely walks, picnics, and enjoying breathtaking views.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to enjoy the park’s beauty in the soft sunlight and cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Accessible by public transportation, including bus or a pleasant walk from nearby neighborhoods.

What to Do: Take a scenic hike or leisurely stroll through the park, relax in the shade of lush trees, and capture stunning photos of Rome’s skyline.

Free or Paid: Free

Palatine Hill, Rome

Overview: Palatine Hill is one of the seven hills of Rome and is known for its ancient archaeological sites, including the Flavian Palace and Domus Augustana.


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History: Considered the birthplace of Rome, Palatine Hill was settled as early as the 10th century BCE and became the residence of emperors during the Roman Empire.

Since When: The hill has been inhabited for over 3,000 years, with significant structures dating back to the Roman Republic and Empire.

Review: A must-visit for history enthusiasts, Palatine Hill offers breathtaking views of the Roman Forum and showcases impressive archaeological remains.

When to Go: Early morning visits are recommended to avoid crowds and to enjoy the serene atmosphere of this ancient site.

How to Go: Accessible on foot or by public transportation, with entrances near the Roman Forum and Circus Maximus.

What to Do: Explore the ruins of imperial palaces, wander through lush gardens, and immerse yourself in the rich history of ancient Rome.

Free or Paid: Paid

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Rome

Overview: Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, also known as the Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, is the cathedral church of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Bishop of Rome.

History: Originally built by Emperor Constantine in the 4th century, the basilica has undergone several reconstructions and renovations over the centuries.

Since When: The current basilica dates back to the 17th century, with earlier versions existing since the 4th century.

Review: A magnificent example of Baroque architecture, San Giovanni in Laterano impresses visitors with its grandeur, ornate decorations, and spiritual significance.

When to Go: Visit during morning hours to experience the basilica’s beauty and attend mass, if interested.

How to Go: Easily accessible by public transportation, including metro and bus, or a short walk from nearby attractions.

What to Do: Admire the impressive facade, explore the interior adorned with stunning artwork and relics, and visit the adjoining Baptistery and Scala Santa.

Free or Paid: Free

Galleria Borghese, Rome

Overview: Galleria Borghese is an art gallery housed in a former villa, showcasing a remarkable collection of sculptures, paintings, and antiquities.

History: Built in the 17th century by Cardinal Scipione Borghese, the villa served as a showcase for his extensive art collection.

Since When: The gallery opened to the public in 1903, showcasing masterpieces by renowned artists such as Bernini, Caravaggio, and Raphael.

Review: A paradise for art lovers, Galleria Borghese offers a curated selection of exquisite works in a stunning setting, surrounded by lush gardens.

When to Go: Advance booking is recommended due to limited entry slots; visit in the morning to enjoy the artworks without crowds.

How to Go: Reservations are required, and access is via timed entry slots; reachable by public transportation or a leisurely stroll from nearby attractions.

What to Do: Marvel at Bernini’s sculptures, admire Caravaggio’s masterpieces, and explore the scenic gardens surrounding the villa.

Free or Paid: Paid

Campidoglio, Rome

Overview: Campidoglio, or Capitoline Hill, is one of the Seven Hills of Rome and houses the Capitoline Museums, Michelangelo’s Piazza del Campidoglio, and the Palazzo Senatorio.

History: Considered the political and religious center of ancient Rome, Campidoglio was redesigned by Michelangelo during the Renaissance.

Since When: Michelangelo’s redesign began in the 16th century, transforming the hill into a monumental civic space.

Review: A masterpiece of urban planning and Renaissance architecture, Campidoglio captivates visitors with its harmonious design and impressive museums.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the panoramic views and avoid the midday heat.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with nearby bus stops and metro stations.

What to Do: Explore the Capitoline Museums, admire Michelangelo’s architecture, and take in panoramic views of the Roman Forum and Palatine Hill.

Free or Paid: Free

Janiculum Hill, Rome

Overview: Janiculum Hill, also known as Gianicolo, offers panoramic views of Rome and is home to monuments, parks, and historic sites.

History: Considered one of Rome’s best-kept secrets, Janiculum Hill holds significance as the site of the battle for Italian unification in the 19th century.

Since When: While inhabited since ancient times, Janiculum Hill became a popular destination for its views and green spaces in the 19th century.

Review: A peaceful retreat from the bustling city below, Janiculum Hill provides stunning vistas of Rome’s skyline and is perfect for a leisurely stroll or a picnic.

When to Go: Sunset offers the best views as the city lights up, creating a magical atmosphere atop the hill.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with buses and trams serving the area.

What to Do: Enjoy panoramic views of Rome, visit the Garibaldi Monument, and explore the quaint streets and parks surrounding the hill.

Free or Paid: Free

Baths of Caracalla, Rome

Overview: The Baths of Caracalla are ancient Roman public baths renowned for their grandeur, architectural beauty, and historical significance.

History: Built between AD 212 and 216 during the reign of Emperor Caracalla, the baths were one of the largest and most impressive in ancient Rome.

Since When: The baths operated until the 6th century before falling into ruin and becoming an archaeological site open to the public.

Review: A must-visit for history buffs, the Baths of Caracalla impress with their massive scale, intricate mosaics, and well-preserved ruins.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and to explore the site comfortably in the cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with buses and metro stations nearby.

What to Do: Wander through the vast ruins, admire the well-preserved mosaics and sculptures, and imagine the ancient Roman bathing rituals.

Free or Paid: Paid

Giardino degli Aranci, Rome

Overview: Giardino degli Aranci, or Orange Garden, is a charming park atop the Aventine Hill known for its fragrant orange trees and panoramic views.

History: Established in the 16th century by the Savelli family, the garden was later redesigned in the 1930s to its current layout.

Since When: The garden has been open to the public for centuries, offering a peaceful retreat in the heart of Rome.

Review: A hidden gem offering a serene atmosphere and stunning views of Rome’s landmarks, Giardino degli Aranci is perfect for a relaxing stroll or a romantic sunset.

When to Go: Sunset offers a magical experience as the golden light bathes the cityscape in warm hues.

How to Go: Accessible by foot or public transportation, with nearby bus stops and a short walk from the Circus Maximus.

What to Do: Relax amidst the fragrant orange trees, admire the panoramic views of Rome, and visit the nearby keyhole to peek into Vatican City.

Free or Paid: Free

St. Angelo Bridge, Rome

Overview: St. Angelo Bridge, also known as Ponte Sant’Angelo, is a historic bridge spanning the Tiber River and leading to the iconic Castel Sant’Angelo.

History: Built by Emperor Hadrian in AD 134, the bridge originally served as a passage to the mausoleum of Emperor Hadrian.

Since When: The bridge has undergone several renovations over the centuries and remains a vital crossing point for pedestrians in Rome.

Review: Adorned with ten angel sculptures designed by Bernini and his workshop, St. Angelo Bridge offers a picturesque walk with stunning views of the river and the castle.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or evening for the best photo opportunities and to avoid crowds.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from nearby attractions or via public transportation, with buses and metro stations in the vicinity.

What to Do: Enjoy a leisurely stroll across the bridge, admire the Baroque statues, and explore Castel Sant’Angelo for a glimpse into Rome’s history.

Free or Paid: Free

Villa Doria Pamphili, Rome

Overview: Villa Doria Pamphili is one of the largest and most beautiful landscaped gardens in Rome, offering lush greenery, walking paths, and historical monuments.

History: Originally owned by the Pamphili family, the villa and its gardens were acquired by the Italian state in the 20th century and opened to the public.

Since When: The villa and gardens have been accessible to the public since 1957, providing a tranquil escape from the city bustle.

Review: A peaceful oasis away from the crowds, Villa Doria Pamphili is perfect for a leisurely stroll, picnic, or outdoor activities amidst scenic surroundings.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the serenity and beauty of the gardens.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, public transportation, or car, with nearby bus stops and parking available.

What to Do: Explore the expansive gardens, admire the architecture of the villa, relax by the ponds, and enjoy panoramic views of Rome from the Belvedere.

Free or Paid: Free

Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere, Rome

Overview: Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of Rome’s oldest churches, known for its stunning mosaics, Romanesque architecture, and vibrant atmosphere.

History: Dating back to the 4th century, the basilica has undergone several renovations and additions over the centuries, reflecting various architectural styles.

Since When: The present basilica was consecrated in the 12th century, but the site has been a place of worship since early Christian times.

Review: A hidden gem in the charming neighborhood of Trastevere, the basilica impresses with its intricate mosaics, rich history, and spiritual ambiance.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and to experience the tranquil atmosphere during Mass or for a quiet moment of reflection.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, tram, or bus, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available.

What to Do: Admire the Byzantine mosaics, explore the interior adorned with marble columns and frescoes, and attend a religious service for a spiritual experience.

Free or Paid: Free

Mouth of Truth, Rome

Overview: The Mouth of Truth, or Bocca della Verità, is a legendary marble mask located in the portico of the Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, believed to bite off the hands of liars.

History: Dating back to ancient Rome, the origin and purpose of the mask remain uncertain, but it has become a popular tourist attraction and symbol of honesty.

Since When: The Mouth of Truth has been part of the Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin since the Middle Ages, attracting visitors from around the world.

Review: A unique and fun experience for visitors, the Mouth of Truth offers a playful photo opportunity and a glimpse into Roman folklore and superstition.

When to Go: Visit during off-peak hours to avoid long lines and to capture the perfect photo with the iconic mask.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, tram, or bus, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available.

What to Do: Queue to place your hand in the mouth of the mask for a photo, explore the interior of the basilica, and wander through the charming neighborhood of Trastevere.

Free or Paid: Free

Trastevere, Rome

Overview: Trastevere is a picturesque neighborhood in Rome known for its narrow cobblestone streets, medieval churches, vibrant nightlife, and authentic Roman atmosphere.

History: Once a working-class district, Trastevere has retained its historic charm and character while becoming a trendy hotspot for locals and tourists alike.

Since When: Trastevere has been inhabited since ancient times, but its current appeal as a cultural and culinary hub emerged in the 20th century.

Review: A must-visit destination for its lively piazzas, charming cafes, artisan shops, and vibrant street art, Trastevere offers a taste of authentic Roman life.

When to Go: Visit in the evening to experience the neighborhood’s bustling nightlife and to enjoy dinner at one of its many traditional trattorias.

How to Go: Accessible by foot from the historic center of Rome or via tram, with several tram stops serving the area.

What to Do: Explore the winding streets, visit historic churches like Santa Maria in Trastevere, sample Roman cuisine at local eateries, and soak in the neighborhood’s lively atmosphere.

Free or Paid: Free

Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome

Overview: Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore is one of the four major basilicas in Rome, known for its stunning architecture, intricate mosaics, and historical significance.

History: Founded in the 5th century, the basilica was built atop a miraculous snowfall, according to legend, and has since been renovated and embellished over the centuries.

Since When: The basilica has been an important pilgrimage site since its consecration in the 5th century, drawing visitors with its religious and artistic treasures.

Review: A masterpiece of Roman architecture and a testament to Christian devotion, Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore captivates visitors with its grandeur and spiritual ambiance.

When to Go: Visit in the morning to avoid crowds and to experience the basilica’s beauty in the soft morning light.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available.

What to Do: Admire the stunning mosaics in the nave and the triumphal arch, explore the chapels and crypts, and attend a Mass for a spiritual experience.

Free or Paid: Free

Capitoline Museums, Rome

Overview: The Capitoline Museums house a remarkable collection of ancient Roman sculptures, artifacts, and artworks, displayed in the Palazzo dei Conservatori and the Palazzo Nuovo.

History: Established in 1471 by Pope Sixtus IV, the Capitoline Museums are the world’s oldest public museums and were initially designed to showcase ancient Roman statues.

Since When: The museums have been open to the public since the 16th century, attracting art enthusiasts and history lovers from around the globe.

Review: A treasure trove of classical art and archaeological finds, the Capitoline Museums offer a fascinating journey through the history and culture of ancient Rome.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and to have ample time to explore the extensive collection.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or taxi, with nearby parking available, and conveniently located near major landmarks like the Roman Forum and the Colosseum.

What to Do: Marvel at iconic sculptures like the Capitoline Wolf and the Dying Gaul, admire Renaissance masterpieces by artists like Michelangelo and Caravaggio, and explore the museum’s archaeological collections.

Free or Paid: Paid

Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo, Rome

Overview: Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo is a museum housed in the historic Castel Sant’Angelo, offering visitors a glimpse into the castle’s storied past and panoramic views of Rome.

History: Originally built as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian in the 2nd century AD, Castel Sant’Angelo has served various purposes throughout history, including as a fortress, residence, and prison.

Since When: The museum has been open to the public since the 20th century, showcasing a diverse collection of artifacts and artworks spanning centuries of Roman history.

Review: A fascinating blend of military architecture, Renaissance art, and archaeological treasures, Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant’Angelo offers a unique perspective on Rome’s past.

When to Go: Visit during the morning to explore the museum’s exhibits and enjoy panoramic views of the city before it gets too crowded.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or taxi, with nearby parking available, and conveniently located near the Vatican City and St. Peter’s Basilica.

What to Do: Explore the castle’s underground chambers, walk along the fortified walls, admire Renaissance frescoes and sculptures, and enjoy breathtaking views of Rome from the rooftop terrace.

Free or Paid: Paid

Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli, Rome

Overview: Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli, or St. Peter in Chains, is a Roman Catholic church known for housing Michelangelo’s magnificent statue of Moses and the chains that bound St. Peter.

History: Founded in the 5th century to house the relics of St. Peter’s chains, the basilica has undergone several renovations and expansions over the centuries.

Since When: The present basilica was rebuilt in the 15th century and has been an important pilgrimage site ever since, attracting visitors with its sacred relics and stunning artwork.

Review: A hidden gem tucked away in Rome’s Monti neighborhood, Basilica of San Pietro in Vincoli impresses visitors with its beautiful interior and revered relics.

When to Go: Visit in the morning or late afternoon to experience the basilica’s peaceful ambiance and to avoid crowds.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available.

What to Do: Admire Michelangelo’s statue of Moses, view the chains of St. Peter, explore the basilica’s chapels and crypts, and attend a Mass or prayer service for a spiritual experience.

Free or Paid: Free

Ponte Sisto, Rome

Overview: Ponte Sisto is a charming pedestrian bridge spanning the Tiber River, connecting the Trastevere and Campo de’ Fiori neighborhoods and offering picturesque views of the city.

History: Built in the late 15th century by Pope Sixtus IV, Ponte Sisto is one of the oldest bridges in Rome and has undergone several renovations and modifications over the centuries.

Since When: Ponte Sisto has served as a vital link between Rome’s historic districts since its completion in 1479, facilitating trade and transportation across the Tiber River.

Review: With its elegant design and panoramic vistas, Ponte Sisto provides an idyllic setting for a leisurely stroll or a romantic evening walk, offering visitors a glimpse into Rome’s rich architectural heritage.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the bridge’s beauty without the crowds and to witness breathtaking sunset views over the river.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available in the surrounding areas.

What to Do: Take a leisurely walk across the bridge, admire the views of the Tiber River and the historic cityscape, and explore the charming streets and piazzas on both sides of the bridge.

Free or Paid: Free

Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II, Rome

Overview: Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II, also known as the Altar of the Fatherland or Il Vittoriano, is a grandiose monument dedicated to the first king of unified Italy, located in Piazza Venezia.

History: Constructed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to commemorate Italy’s unification and honor King Vittorio Emanuele II, the monument has become an iconic symbol of the nation’s identity and history.

Since When: The monument was inaugurated in 1911 and has since served as a focal point for national celebrations, political events, and cultural gatherings in Rome.

Review: A monumental tribute to Italy’s past and a striking example of Neoclassical architecture, Monumento a Vittorio Emanuele II offers visitors a glimpse into the country’s rich heritage and political legacy.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to fully appreciate the monument’s grandeur and to explore its museums and exhibits, or come in the evening to see it illuminated against the night sky.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available in the vicinity.

What to Do: Ascend to the terrace for panoramic views of Rome, visit the museums dedicated to Italy’s unification and military history, and pay homage to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

Free or Paid: Free entry to most areas, with optional paid access to museums and exhibitions.

Passeggiata del Pincio, Rome

Overview: Passeggiata del Pincio, or Pincian Hill Promenade, is a scenic parkland situated on the Pincian Hill, offering sweeping views of Rome’s historic center and landmarks like Piazza del Popolo and Villa Borghese.

History: Originally part of the gardens belonging to the nearby Villa Medici, Passeggiata del Pincio was transformed into a public park in the early 19th century by architect Giuseppe Valadier, becoming a popular destination for leisurely strolls and picnics.

Since When: The promenade has been open to the public since the early 1800s, providing locals and visitors alike with a tranquil retreat from the bustling streets of Rome.

Review: A verdant oasis in the heart of Rome, Passeggiata del Pincio offers a serene escape from the city’s hustle and bustle, with lush greenery, scenic pathways, and breathtaking views at every turn.

When to Go: Visit during the early morning or late afternoon to enjoy the park’s tranquility and to witness stunning sunrise or sunset views over the city.

How to Go: Accessible by foot, bus, or tram, with nearby public transportation stops and parking available near Piazza del Popolo.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the park’s manicured gardens, relax on a bench and enjoy the panoramic views, and visit nearby attractions like Villa Borghese and Piazza del Popolo.

Free or Paid: Free

Fiumi Fountain, Rome

Overview: Fiumi Fountain, also known as Fontana dei Quattro Fiumi, is a stunning Baroque fountain located in the center of Piazza Navona, depicting four river gods representing the major rivers of the continents known at the time.

History: Designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in the 17th century, the fountain was commissioned by Pope Innocent X as part of the embellishment of Piazza Navona.

Since When: Completed in 1651, Fiumi Fountain has been a beloved landmark in Rome for over three centuries, admired for its artistic beauty and symbolic significance.

Review: Admired for its exquisite craftsmanship and intricate details, Fiumi Fountain is a masterpiece of Baroque artistry and a must-visit attraction in Rome.

When to Go: Visit during the daytime to fully appreciate the fountain’s beauty and to avoid the crowds that gather in the evening.

How to Go: Situated in the heart of Rome’s historic center, Fiumi Fountain is easily accessible by foot from nearby attractions and public transportation hubs.

What to Do: Marvel at the fountain’s sculptural elements and symbolic representations, toss a coin into the water for good luck, and enjoy the lively atmosphere of Piazza Navona.

Free or Paid: Free

 


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