Things to do in Bali

by NeemTime.com Editors
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Things to do in Bali

Things to do in Bali: Based on NeemTime research from most popular to just popular.

Tanah Lot, Bali

Overview: Tanah Lot is an iconic sea temple perched on a rocky outcrop along the southwestern coast of Bali, known for its stunning ocean views and Hindu pilgrimage site.

History: Built in the 16th century by a Hindu priest, Tanah Lot is believed to be one of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast, serving as a symbol of spiritual devotion and protection.

Since When: Tanah Lot has been a sacred site for centuries, attracting visitors seeking blessings, cultural insights, and breathtaking sunsets.

Review: Visitors praise Tanah Lot for its dramatic coastal setting, picturesque views, and cultural significance, making it a must-visit destination for travelers exploring Bali’s cultural heritage.

When to Go: Visit Tanah Lot during low tide to explore the temple complex and surrounding areas, and aim to arrive early in the morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds.

How to Go: Tanah Lot is accessible by car or motorbike from popular tourist areas like Kuta, Seminyak, and Ubud, with parking available near the temple entrance.

What to Do: Explore the temple complex, stroll along the coastal cliffs, witness traditional Balinese dance performances, and capture stunning sunset views over the Indian Ocean.

Free or Paid: Admission to Tanah Lot requires a nominal fee, with additional charges for parking and optional guided tours.

Garuda Wisnu Kencana Cultural Park, Bali

Overview: Garuda Wisnu Kencana (GWK) Cultural Park is a vast cultural complex in Bali featuring the towering Garuda Wisnu Kencana statue, traditional performances, art exhibitions, and scenic gardens.

History: Conceived in the 1990s as a cultural park and iconic landmark, GWK was envisioned to honor Hindu mythology and promote Balinese art, culture, and tourism.

Since When: Development of GWK began in 1997, with the unveiling of the Garuda Wisnu Kencana statue in 2018 marking a significant milestone in the park’s completion.

Review: Visitors appreciate GWK for its impressive statue, sprawling grounds, and cultural experiences, making it a popular destination for families, art enthusiasts, and cultural travelers.

When to Go: Plan your visit during clear weather to fully enjoy outdoor activities and performances, and check the park’s schedule for special events and cultural festivals.

How to Go: GWK is located in Ungasan, about 20-30 minutes from the Ngurah Rai International Airport and major tourist areas like Kuta and Seminyak, accessible by car or taxi.

What to Do: Admire the monumental Garuda Wisnu Kencana statue, explore the park’s exhibitions and cultural displays, watch traditional Balinese dance performances, and enjoy panoramic views of Bali.

Free or Paid: Admission to GWK requires a fee, with different ticket options available for access to various attractions and facilities within the park.

Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary, Bali

Overview: The Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary is a natural reserve and Hindu temple complex in Ubud, Bali, home to hundreds of long-tailed macaque monkeys and lush tropical vegetation.

History: Established in the 14th century as a spiritual and conservation area, the Monkey Forest has evolved into a popular tourist destination and important ecological site.

Since When: The Monkey Forest has been a sanctuary for centuries, preserving Balinese Hindu traditions, biodiversity, and cultural heritage for visitors to experience and explore.

Review: Travelers praise the Monkey Forest for its scenic beauty, cultural significance, and close encounters with monkeys, offering a unique and immersive jungle experience in Bali.

When to Go: Visit the Monkey Forest during the morning or late afternoon to observe monkeys in their natural habitat and avoid the midday heat and crowds.

How to Go: The Monkey Forest is centrally located in Ubud, within walking distance from many hotels and guesthouses, or accessible by car or motorbike from other areas of Bali.

What to Do: Wander through the lush forest trails, observe monkeys in their natural habitat, explore ancient temples and stone carvings, and enjoy the serene beauty of the natural surroundings.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary requires a fee, with proceeds supporting conservation efforts and temple maintenance.

Ceking Rice Terrace, Bali

Overview: Ceking Rice Terrace is a breathtaking agricultural landscape in Bali characterized by tiered rice paddies, offering stunning panoramic views of lush greenery against the backdrop of Mount Agung.

History: These terraces have been sculpted by generations of Balinese farmers using traditional irrigation techniques, reflecting the island’s rich agricultural heritage and the symbiotic relationship between culture and nature.

Since When: The Ceking Rice Terrace has been cultivated for centuries, serving as a vital source of sustenance for local communities and attracting tourists seeking to immerse themselves in Bali’s natural beauty.

Review: Visitors praise the Ceking Rice Terrace for its picturesque vistas, serene ambiance, and opportunities for trekking and photography, making it a must-visit destination for nature lovers and photographers.

When to Go: The best time to visit is during the dry season (April to October) when the rice paddies are at their greenest and most vibrant, offering ideal conditions for exploring and photography.

How to Go: Ceking Rice Terrace is located in the village of Tegalalang, approximately 20 minutes north of Ubud, accessible by car, motorbike, or guided tour.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll or hike through the terraced fields, interact with local farmers, capture stunning photographs of the landscape, and savor the tranquility of rural Bali.

Free or Paid: While there is no official admission fee, visitors are encouraged to make a small donation to support the maintenance of the terraces and the local community.

Pandawa Beach, Bali

Overview: Pandawa Beach is a hidden gem nestled between towering limestone cliffs on the southern coast of Bali, known for its pristine white sand, turquoise waters, and tranquil atmosphere.

History: Formerly known as Secret Beach, Pandawa Beach was transformed into a popular tourist destination in the early 2010s, following the development of access roads and tourism infrastructure.

Since When: Pandawa Beach gained prominence as a tourist destination around 2012, attracting visitors seeking a secluded beach experience away from the crowds of Kuta and Seminyak.

Review: Travelers rave about Pandawa Beach for its natural beauty, clear waters, and relaxed ambiance, making it an ideal spot for swimming, sunbathing, and enjoying water sports.

When to Go: Visit Pandawa Beach during the dry season (April to October) for optimal weather conditions and calm seas, avoiding the peak tourist hours for a more peaceful experience.

How to Go: Located in the village of Kutuh, Pandawa Beach is accessible by car or scooter from major tourist areas in southern Bali, with parking available near the entrance.

What to Do: Relax on the pristine sandy shore, swim in the crystal-clear waters, rent a sun lounger or umbrella, explore nearby caves and cliffs, and indulge in local seafood at beachside cafes.

Free or Paid: Access to Pandawa Beach is free of charge, although visitors may need to pay for parking and facilities such as sun loungers and umbrellas.

Uluwatu Temple, Bali

Overview: Uluwatu Temple is a majestic sea temple perched atop steep cliffs overlooking the Indian Ocean, renowned for its dramatic location, traditional Balinese architecture, and mesmerizing sunset views.

History: Built in the 11th century by a Javanese Hindu sage, Uluwatu Temple is one of Bali’s six key spiritual sanctuaries, dedicated to the worship of the sea gods and protecting the island from evil spirits.

Since When: Uluwatu Temple has stood as a sacred site for over a millennium, attracting devotees, pilgrims, and tourists alike to marvel at its architectural beauty and spiritual significance.

Review: Visitors rave about Uluwatu Temple for its stunning cliffside setting, mesmerizing Kecak fire dance performances, and panoramic sunset views, making it a must-visit destination for cultural and natural wonders.

When to Go: The best time to visit is in the late afternoon to witness the iconic sunset over the Indian Ocean and experience the captivating Kecak dance performance held daily at the temple.

How to Go: Uluwatu Temple is located on the southwestern tip of Bali, approximately 30 kilometers from Kuta, accessible by car, motorbike, or organized tour.

What to Do: Explore the temple complex and its scenic surroundings, attend a traditional Kecak dance performance at sunset, enjoy panoramic ocean views, and observe playful monkeys roaming the area.

Free or Paid: Admission to Uluwatu Temple requires a nominal fee, with additional charges for parking and entrance to cultural performances.

Ulun Danu Beratan Temple, Bali

Overview: Ulun Danu Beratan Temple is a picturesque water temple located on the shores of Lake Bratan in Bali, known for its stunning setting, traditional Balinese architecture, and tranquil ambiance.

History: Built in the 17th century by the King of Mengwi, Ulun Danu Beratan Temple is dedicated to Dewi Danu, the goddess of water, lakes, and rivers, serving as a place of worship and irrigation control for the surrounding rice fields.

Since When: The temple has been a significant religious site for centuries, playing a vital role in Balinese Hinduism and attracting visitors seeking spiritual solace and natural beauty.

Review: Visitors praise Ulun Danu Beratan Temple for its serene atmosphere, breathtaking mountain backdrop, and well-manicured gardens, making it a perfect spot for photography and cultural immersion.

When to Go: The best time to visit is during the dry season (April to October) when the weather is pleasant, and the lake’s water levels are high, offering postcard-perfect reflections of the temple.

How to Go: Ulun Danu Beratan Temple is located in the Bedugul highlands of central Bali, approximately two hours’ drive from Denpasar, accessible by car, taxi, or organized tour.

What to Do: Explore the temple complex, stroll along the lakeside pathways, rent a traditional paddleboat to tour the lake, admire the surrounding landscapes, and visit nearby attractions such as the Bali Botanic Garden.

Free or Paid: Admission to Ulun Danu Beratan Temple requires a small entrance fee, with additional charges for parking and boat rentals.

Penglipuran Village, Bali

Overview: Penglipuran Village is a traditional Balinese village located in the Bangli regency of Bali, renowned for its well-preserved architecture, cultural heritage, and warm hospitality.

History: Established in the 18th century, Penglipuran Village is one of Bali’s oldest settlements, known for its unique layout, traditional houses, and adherence to customary Balinese beliefs and customs.

Since When: The village has been inhabited for centuries by the indigenous Bali Aga people, who maintain a sustainable way of life based on agriculture, craftsmanship, and community values.

Review: Visitors laud Penglipuran Village for its authentic ambiance, friendly locals, and insightful cultural experiences, offering a glimpse into traditional Balinese village life away from the tourist crowds.

When to Go: Penglipuran Village can be visited year-round, although the dry season (April to October) offers more favorable weather conditions for exploring the village and its surroundings.

How to Go: Penglipuran Village is located in the Bangli regency, approximately one hour’s drive from Ubud, accessible by car, motorbike, or guided tour.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll through the village’s narrow pathways, interact with local residents, admire traditional Balinese architecture, visit the village temple, and shop for handmade crafts and souvenirs.

Free or Paid: There is no admission fee to enter Penglipuran Village, although visitors are encouraged to support the local community by purchasing souvenirs or participating in cultural activities.

Pura Tirta Empul, Bali

Overview: Pura Tirta Empul is a revered water temple located near the town of Tampaksiring in Bali, renowned for its sacred spring water, purification rituals, and ornate Balinese architecture.

History: Dating back to the 10th century, Pura Tirta Empul is steeped in legend and mythology, believed to have been created by the god Indra to cure his soldiers of poisoning, making it a place of healing and spiritual renewal.

Since When: The temple has been a sacred site for over a millennium, attracting pilgrims and visitors seeking spiritual cleansing and purification in the holy spring water.

Review: Travelers praise Pura Tirta Empul for its serene ambiance, spiritual significance, and unique bathing rituals, offering a profound and introspective cultural experience for visitors.

When to Go: The best time to visit is during the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and witness traditional Balinese rituals, particularly during religious festivals such as Galungan and Kuningan.

How to Go: Pura Tirta Empul is located in the village of Manukaya, approximately 30 kilometers northeast of Ubud, accessible by car, taxi, or guided tour.

What to Do: Participate in the temple’s purification rituals, bathe in the sacred springs, explore the temple complex and its surrounding gardens, and gain insight into Balinese Hinduism and spiritual practices.

Free or Paid: Admission to Pura Tirta Empul requires a nominal fee, with additional charges for sarong rentals and offerings at the temple.

Bali Safari and Marine Park, Bali

Overview: Bali Safari and Marine Park is a wildlife conservation center and theme park in Bali, offering visitors the opportunity to observe exotic animals in their natural habitats and enjoy thrilling safari adventures.

History: Established in 2007, Bali Safari and Marine Park aims to educate the public about wildlife conservation while providing a safe and immersive experience for guests to interact with a wide variety of animals.

Since When: The park has been welcoming visitors since 2007, becoming one of Bali’s top tourist attractions and a leading advocate for wildlife preservation in the region.

Review: Visitors praise Bali Safari and Marine Park for its well-maintained facilities, diverse animal species, and engaging safari tours, making it an ideal destination for families and wildlife enthusiasts.

When to Go: The park is open year-round, but it’s best to visit during the dry season (April to October) to enjoy pleasant weather and avoid heavy rainfall.

How to Go: Bali Safari and Marine Park is located in Gianyar Regency, approximately an hour’s drive from popular tourist areas like Ubud and Kuta, accessible by car, taxi, or organized tour.

What to Do: Explore the park on a safari journey, interact with animals during feeding sessions, watch captivating animal shows, and enjoy water park attractions and cultural performances.

Free or Paid: Admission to Bali Safari and Marine Park requires a ticket purchase, with different packages available for safari tours and additional activities.

Bali Zoo, Bali

Overview: Bali Zoo is a family-friendly zoo and conservation park in Bali, dedicated to the preservation of Indonesian wildlife species and providing educational and recreational experiences for visitors.

History: Founded in 2002, Bali Zoo aims to raise awareness about wildlife conservation and biodiversity through immersive animal encounters, educational programs, and sustainable practices.

Since When: The zoo has been welcoming guests since 2002, offering a unique opportunity to observe a diverse range of animals in naturalistic habitats.

Review: Travelers commend Bali Zoo for its well-designed enclosures, knowledgeable staff, and ethical treatment of animals, making it an enjoyable and educational destination for visitors of all ages.

When to Go: Bali Zoo is open year-round, but it’s best to visit during the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and observe animals during their most active periods.

How to Go: Located in Singapadu, Gianyar Regency, Bali Zoo is easily accessible by car, taxi, or shuttle service from major tourist areas such as Ubud and Kuta.

What to Do: Take a guided tour of the zoo, participate in animal feeding experiences, interact with animals in the petting zoo, and enjoy cultural performances and dining options within the park.

Free or Paid: Admission to Bali Zoo requires a ticket purchase, with additional fees for animal encounters and experiences.

Tirta Gangga, Bali

Overview: Tirta Gangga is a stunning water palace and sacred site in Bali, known for its ornate pools, lush gardens, and spiritual significance in Balinese Hinduism.

History: Built in the early 20th century by the King of Karangasem, Tirta Gangga served as a royal palace and bathing complex, featuring intricate architecture and decorative sculptures inspired by Hindu mythology.

Since When: Tirta Gangga has been a place of pilgrimage and cultural heritage for over a century, attracting visitors seeking tranquility, spiritual renewal, and architectural beauty.

Review: Visitors rave about Tirta Gangga’s serene atmosphere, picturesque landscapes, and historical significance, making it a must-visit destination for travelers exploring Bali’s cultural attractions.

When to Go: The best time to visit Tirta Gangga is during the dry season (April to October) when the weather is pleasant, and the gardens are in full bloom, creating a magical ambiance.

How to Go: Located in the village of Ababi, Karangasem Regency, Tirta Gangga is accessible by car or motorcycle from popular tourist areas like Ubud and Candidasa.

What to Do: Explore the palace grounds, admire the traditional Balinese architecture, relax by the sacred pools, and take in panoramic views of the surrounding rice fields and mountains.

Free or Paid: Admission to Tirta Gangga requires a small entrance fee, with additional charges for parking and facilities.

Waterbom Bali, Bali

Overview: Waterbom Bali is a popular water park in Bali, offering thrilling water slides, lazy rivers, and family-friendly attractions amidst lush tropical surroundings.

History: Established in 1993, Waterbom Bali has evolved into one of Asia’s top water parks, providing guests with exciting aquatic adventures and world-class facilities.

Since When: Waterbom Bali has been entertaining visitors since 1993, continuously upgrading its attractions and services to maintain its reputation as a premier water park destination.

Review: Guests praise Waterbom Bali for its variety of slides, safety standards, and cleanliness, making it an enjoyable experience for visitors of all ages seeking water-based fun in Bali.

When to Go: The water park is open year-round, but it’s best to visit during the dry season (April to October) for optimal weather conditions and fewer crowds.

How to Go: Located in Kuta, Waterbom Bali is easily accessible by car, taxi, or shuttle service from various tourist areas in Bali, with ample parking available on-site.

What to Do: Experience adrenaline-pumping rides like the Climax and Pipeline, relax in the lazy river or on the sun loungers, enjoy delicious food and drinks at the on-site restaurants, and make memories with family and friends.

Free or Paid: Admission to Waterbom Bali requires a ticket purchase, with different packages available for single entry or unlimited access to attractions.

Tegalalang Rice Terrace, Bali

Overview: Tegalalang Rice Terrace is a breathtaking UNESCO World Heritage Site in Bali, renowned for its stunning terraced landscapes and traditional Balinese agriculture.

History: Dating back over 2,000 years, Tegalalang Rice Terrace reflects Bali’s rich agricultural heritage and the ingenuity of Balinese farmers who sculpted the land to create the iconic terraced fields.

Since When: Tegalalang Rice Terrace has been cultivated by local farmers for centuries, becoming a symbol of Bali’s cultural and agricultural significance.

Review: Visitors rave about the natural beauty and cultural significance of Tegalalang Rice Terrace, making it a must-visit destination for travelers seeking picturesque landscapes and authentic Balinese experiences.

When to Go: The best time to visit Tegalalang Rice Terrace is during the dry season (April to October) when the rice paddies are lush and green, creating a stunning backdrop for photography.

How to Go: Located near Ubud, Tegalalang Rice Terrace is easily accessible by car or motorcycle from major tourist areas in Bali, with parking available near the entrance.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll along the terraced paths, interact with local farmers, capture panoramic views of the rice fields, and support small businesses selling handicrafts and souvenirs.

Free or Paid: Visiting Tegalalang Rice Terrace is generally free, but donations may be requested by local farmers or small businesses for maintaining the paths and facilities.

Besakih Great Temple, Bali

Overview: Besakih Great Temple, also known as Pura Besakih, is the largest and holiest Hindu temple complex in Bali, perched on the slopes of Mount Agung and comprising over 80 individual temples.

History: Dating back over 1,000 years, Besakih Great Temple is believed to have been founded in the 8th century, serving as a center of worship and pilgrimage for Balinese Hindus.

Since When: Besakih Great Temple has been a sacred site of worship for centuries, attracting devotees, pilgrims, and tourists from around the world to experience its spiritual significance and architectural beauty.

Review: Visitors praise the awe-inspiring architecture, spiritual ambiance, and panoramic views of Mount Agung from Besakih Great Temple, making it a must-visit destination for cultural enthusiasts and spiritual seekers.

When to Go: It’s best to visit Besakih Great Temple during the dry season (April to October) to enjoy clear skies and avoid heavy rainfall, although the temple is open year-round for visitors.

How to Go: Located in the Karangasem Regency, Besakih Great Temple is accessible by car or motorcycle from various tourist areas in Bali, with parking available near the entrance.

What to Do: Explore the temple complex, attend a traditional Hindu ceremony or ritual, admire the intricate architecture and stone carvings, and enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding countryside.

Free or Paid: Visiting Besakih Great Temple requires a small donation for maintenance and upkeep, with optional fees for guided tours or ceremonies.


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Bajra Sandhi Monument, Bali

Overview: Bajra Sandhi Monument is a towering landmark in Denpasar, Bali, commemorating the struggles and triumphs of the Balinese people throughout history.

History: Built in 1987, the monument symbolizes the resilience of the Balinese people and honors their cultural heritage, featuring exhibitions and artifacts detailing Bali’s history and independence movement.

Since When: Bajra Sandhi Monument has stood as a symbol of Bali’s cultural identity and historical significance since its inauguration in 1987.

Review: Visitors appreciate the monument’s architectural grandeur, informative exhibits, and panoramic views from the top, offering a deeper understanding of Bali’s rich cultural heritage and struggle for independence.

When to Go: Bajra Sandhi Monument can be visited year-round, but it’s best to go during the early morning or late afternoon to avoid crowds and capture stunning photos in favorable lighting.

How to Go: Located in Denpasar, Bajra Sandhi Monument is easily accessible by car or motorcycle from major tourist areas in Bali, with parking available near the entrance.

What to Do: Explore the monument’s exhibitions and displays, climb to the top for panoramic views of Denpasar, and take photos with the iconic monument as a backdrop.

Free or Paid: Admission to Bajra Sandhi Monument is typically free, although a small fee may be charged for access to certain exhibits or viewpoints.

Real Bali Swing, Bali

Overview: Real Bali Swing offers exhilarating swing experiences amidst lush jungle scenery, providing adventurers with thrilling rides and breathtaking views of Bali’s natural beauty.

History: The swing attraction trend began in Bali in the early 2010s, with Real Bali Swing becoming a popular destination for tourists seeking adrenaline-pumping experiences and Instagram-worthy photos.

Since When: Real Bali Swing has been offering swing experiences and jungle adventures since its inception in the early 2010s, becoming a must-visit attraction for thrill-seekers and nature lovers.

Review: Visitors praise Real Bali Swing for its well-maintained swings, safety measures, and stunning views of the jungle and rice terraces, making it an exciting and memorable experience for adventure enthusiasts.

When to Go: Real Bali Swing can be enjoyed year-round, but it’s recommended to visit during the dry season (April to October) for clear skies and optimal weather conditions.

How to Go: Located in various locations across Bali, Real Bali Swing can be reached by car or motorcycle from major tourist areas, with shuttle services also available from select locations.

What to Do: Experience the thrill of swinging high above the jungle canopy, capture stunning photos and videos, explore the surrounding nature trails, and enjoy refreshments at on-site cafes.

Free or Paid: Admission to Real Bali Swing requires a ticket purchase, with different packages available for single swings or multiple attractions.

Campuhan Ridge Walk, Bali

Overview: Campuhan Ridge Walk offers a scenic hiking trail through lush rice fields and rolling hills in Ubud, Bali, providing visitors with serene natural beauty and peaceful surroundings.

History: The ridge walk has been a beloved hiking trail for locals and tourists alike for decades, offering a tranquil escape from the hustle and bustle of city life amidst Bali’s picturesque landscapes.

Since When: Campuhan Ridge Walk has been a favorite destination for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts since its discovery by early travelers to Ubud, offering a refreshing retreat into Bali’s rural beauty.

Review: Hikers appreciate the peaceful ambiance, stunning views, and easy accessibility of Campuhan Ridge Walk, making it a perfect spot for nature walks, photography sessions, and quiet contemplation.

When to Go: The ridge walk can be enjoyed year-round, but it’s best to go early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the midday heat and capture the golden hues of sunrise or sunset.

How to Go: Located near Ubud’s city center, Campuhan Ridge Walk can be reached by car or motorcycle, with parking available near the trailhead at Warwick Ibah Luxury Villas & Spa.

What to Do: Take a leisurely stroll along the ridge trail, admire panoramic views of the lush countryside, explore hidden temples and villages, and enjoy a peaceful retreat into nature.

Free or Paid: Campuhan Ridge Walk is free to access, making it an affordable and rewarding outdoor activity for visitors to Ubud.

Ubud Palace, Bali

Overview: Ubud Palace, also known as Puri Saren Agung, is a historical landmark in the heart of Ubud, Bali, renowned for its traditional Balinese architecture and cultural performances.

History: Built in the 19th century during the reign of the Sukawati royal family, Ubud Palace served as the residence of Ubud’s kings and is a symbol of the town’s rich cultural heritage.

Since When: Ubud Palace has stood as a cultural and architectural icon since its construction in the early 1800s, attracting visitors from around the world to admire its beauty and significance.

Review: Visitors praise Ubud Palace for its intricate carvings, serene gardens, and vibrant cultural performances, offering an immersive glimpse into Balinese royal life and traditions.

When to Go: It’s best to visit Ubud Palace during the late afternoon or early evening to witness traditional dance performances and explore the palace grounds in cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Located in the center of Ubud, Ubud Palace is easily accessible by foot or taxi from various accommodations and attractions in the area.

What to Do: Attend a traditional Balinese dance performance, admire the palace’s architecture and gardens, and explore nearby art galleries, shops, and restaurants.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Ubud Palace is typically free for visitors to explore the outer courtyards and gardens, while there may be a fee for attending cultural performances inside the palace.

Bali Bird Park, Bali

Overview: Bali Bird Park is a lush aviary and conservation center in Gianyar, Bali, home to over 1,000 species of birds from Indonesia and around the world.

History: Established in 1995, Bali Bird Park aims to conserve Indonesia’s avian biodiversity while providing educational and recreational experiences for visitors of all ages.

Since When: Bali Bird Park has been a haven for bird enthusiasts and nature lovers since its opening in 1995, offering immersive encounters with exotic bird species in a natural setting.

Review: Visitors rave about Bali Bird Park’s extensive bird collection, well-maintained habitats, and informative bird shows and presentations, making it a must-visit destination for families and wildlife enthusiasts.

When to Go: Bali Bird Park is open year-round, but it’s best to visit in the morning when the birds are most active and temperatures are cooler.

How to Go: Located in Gianyar, Bali Bird Park is easily accessible by car or taxi from popular tourist areas such as Ubud and Kuta.

What to Do: Explore the park’s diverse bird exhibits, watch interactive bird shows and feeding sessions, and take part in educational programs and bird photography sessions.

Free or Paid: Admission to Bali Bird Park requires a ticket purchase, with discounts available for children and groups.

Jatiluwih Rice Terraces, Bali

Overview: Jatiluwih Rice Terraces is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Tabanan, Bali, famous for its breathtaking landscapes of terraced rice fields and traditional Balinese agriculture.

History: Dating back over 2,000 years, the Jatiluwih Rice Terraces reflect Bali’s ancient Subak irrigation system and the island’s cultural landscape shaped by rice cultivation.

Since When: The Jatiluwih Rice Terraces have been cultivated by generations of Balinese farmers for centuries, showcasing the sustainable agricultural practices that have sustained Bali’s communities for millennia.

Review: Visitors marvel at the beauty and tranquility of the Jatiluwih Rice Terraces, praising their scenic vistas, cultural significance, and opportunities for hiking and photography.

When to Go: The best time to visit Jatiluwih Rice Terraces is during the dry season (April to October) when the rice paddies are at their greenest and most picturesque.

How to Go: Situated in Tabanan Regency, Jatiluwih Rice Terraces can be reached by car or motorcycle from major tourist areas in Bali, with guided tours and transportation services also available.

What to Do: Take a leisurely walk or bike ride through the terraced fields, visit local villages and temples, and savor traditional Balinese cuisine at nearby restaurants overlooking the rice paddies.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Jatiluwih Rice Terraces requires a fee, which helps support the local community and conservation efforts to preserve this cultural landscape.

Sukawati Art Market, Bali

Overview: Sukawati Art Market is a bustling traditional market in Gianyar, Bali, renowned for its wide range of local handicrafts, artworks, and souvenirs.

History: Established in the 1980s, Sukawati Art Market has been a hub for Balinese artists and artisans to showcase their craftsmanship and creativity to visitors from around the world.

Since When: Sukawati Art Market has been a vibrant center of Balinese art and culture since its founding in the 1980s, attracting tourists and art enthusiasts seeking authentic Balinese handicrafts.

Review: Visitors praise Sukawati Art Market for its vibrant atmosphere, diverse selection of goods, and opportunities for bargaining, making it a must-visit destination for souvenir shopping in Bali.

When to Go: Sukawati Art Market is open daily from morning until late afternoon, with weekdays generally less crowded than weekends.

How to Go: Located in Gianyar Regency, Sukawati Art Market is easily accessible by car or motorcycle from popular tourist areas in Bali, such as Ubud and Sanur.

What to Do: Explore the market’s stalls to find unique Balinese artworks, textiles, woodcarvings, and souvenirs, and don’t forget to haggle for the best prices.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Sukawati Art Market is free, but visitors should be prepared to pay for any purchases they make.

Waterblow, Bali

Overview: Waterblow is a natural phenomenon located on the southern coast of Bali near Nusa Dua, where powerful waves crash against the cliffs, creating a spectacular ocean spray.

History: Formed over centuries by the erosive forces of the Indian Ocean, Waterblow has become a popular attraction for visitors seeking awe-inspiring views and dramatic scenery.

Since When: Waterblow has been a natural spectacle for countless years, but its popularity as a tourist destination has grown significantly in recent decades.

Review: Visitors are captivated by the raw power and beauty of Waterblow, making it a must-see destination for nature lovers and photographers looking to capture dramatic coastal landscapes.

When to Go: It’s best to visit Waterblow during high tide and windy conditions when the waves are at their most powerful, typically in the afternoon.

How to Go: Waterblow is located in the southern part of Bali near Nusa Dua, accessible by car or motorbike from nearby tourist areas, with parking available near the site.

What to Do: Enjoy breathtaking views of the crashing waves and ocean spray, take photos of the dramatic scenery, and feel the exhilarating rush of wind and water.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Waterblow is free for all visitors.

Taman Ujung, Bali

Overview: Taman Ujung, also known as Ujung Water Palace, is a stunning water palace complex located in Karangasem, Bali, featuring ornate architecture, tranquil ponds, and lush gardens.

History: Built in the early 20th century by the King of Karangasem, Taman Ujung served as a royal retreat and a venue for hosting dignitaries and special events.

Since When: Taman Ujung was completed in 1921 and has since been admired for its blend of Balinese, European, and Chinese architectural styles, attracting visitors seeking cultural and historical insights.

Review: Visitors praise Taman Ujung for its serene ambiance, picturesque setting, and well-preserved historical structures, making it a hidden gem worth exploring in Bali.

When to Go: Taman Ujung can be visited year-round, but it’s best to go early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid crowds and enjoy cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Situated in Karangasem Regency, Taman Ujung is accessible by car or motorcycle from various parts of Bali, with guided tours and transportation services available.

What to Do: Stroll through the palace grounds, admire the ornate architecture and scenic views, and take photos by the tranquil ponds and pathways.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Taman Ujung requires a fee, with proceeds contributing to the preservation and maintenance of the historical site.

Taman Ayun Temple, Bali

Overview: Taman Ayun Temple is a majestic royal temple located in Mengwi, Bali, known for its stunning traditional Balinese architecture and serene garden surroundings.

History: Built in the 17th century by the Mengwi Kingdom, Taman Ayun Temple served as the main temple of the royal family and a place of worship for Hindu devotees.

Since When: Taman Ayun Temple has stood as a symbol of Balinese cultural heritage since its construction in 1634, representing the harmonious relationship between nature and spirituality.

Review: Visitors praise Taman Ayun Temple for its intricate stone carvings, tranquil atmosphere, and well-maintained gardens, making it a must-visit destination for those seeking cultural and spiritual experiences in Bali.

When to Go: It’s best to visit Taman Ayun Temple in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds and enjoy cooler temperatures.

How to Go: Taman Ayun Temple is located in Mengwi, about a 30-minute drive from Ubud or Denpasar, making it accessible by car or motorcycle, with guided tours also available.

What to Do: Explore the temple’s expansive grounds, admire the ornate architecture and tranquil ponds, and participate in Hindu rituals or ceremonies if available.

Free or Paid: Entrance to Taman Ayun Temple requires a small fee for visitors.

Kecak Uluwatu, Bali

Overview: Kecak Uluwatu is a traditional Balinese dance performance held at the iconic Uluwatu Temple, featuring captivating choreography, vocal chanting, and dramatic fire dances against the backdrop of the sunset.

History: The Kecak dance originated in the 1930s as a form of ritualistic storytelling based on the Hindu epic, Ramayana, and has since become a popular cultural performance in Bali.

Since When: Kecak Uluwatu has been entertaining audiences with its mesmerizing performances since the mid-20th century, showcasing the rich cultural heritage of Bali.

Review: Visitors rave about the mesmerizing beauty and cultural significance of Kecak Uluwatu, describing it as a captivating experience that shouldn’t be missed when visiting Bali.

When to Go: Kecak Uluwatu performances are typically held in the late afternoon to coincide with the sunset, creating a magical ambiance for spectators.

How to Go: Uluwatu Temple is located in the southern part of Bali, accessible by car or motorcycle from popular tourist areas like Kuta and Seminyak, with organized tours also available.

What to Do: Enjoy the spellbinding Kecak performance against the backdrop of the setting sun, explore the majestic Uluwatu Temple, and witness the breathtaking ocean views from the cliffside.

Free or Paid: There is usually an admission fee to watch the Kecak Uluwatu performance at Uluwatu Temple.

Bali Bomb Memorial, Bali

Overview: The Bali Bomb Memorial in Kuta is a solemn tribute to the victims of the tragic Bali bombings in 2002, featuring a peaceful park with memorial plaques and sculptures.

History: The memorial was built to commemorate the lives lost in the terrorist attacks on October 12, 2002, which targeted popular tourist areas in Bali, including Kuta.

Since When: The Bali Bomb Memorial was established shortly after the bombings and has since become a place of reflection and remembrance for locals and visitors alike.

Review: The Bali Bomb Memorial serves as a poignant reminder of the resilience and unity of the Balinese people in the face of tragedy, offering a peaceful space for contemplation and honoring the victims.

When to Go: The memorial can be visited at any time, but it’s recommended to go during quieter hours to pay your respects and reflect on the significance of the site.

How to Go: The Bali Bomb Memorial is located on Jalan Legian in Kuta, easily accessible by car, motorcycle, or on foot from nearby accommodations and tourist areas.

What to Do: Take a moment to read the memorial plaques, pay your respects to the victims and their families, and reflect on the impact of the Bali bombings on the local community and tourism industry.

Free or Paid: Admission to the Bali Bomb Memorial is free for all visitors.

Toya Devasya, Bali

Overview: Toya Devasya is a picturesque natural hot spring resort nestled in the lush landscape of Kintamani, offering stunning views of Lake Batur and Mount Batur.

History: Developed as a recreational retreat, Toya Devasya harnesses the natural geothermal waters of the region, providing visitors with a rejuvenating experience amidst Bali’s volcanic terrain.

Since When: Toya Devasya has been welcoming guests seeking relaxation and wellness since its establishment as a hot spring resort in the Kintamani area.

Review: Visitors praise Toya Devasya for its tranquil ambiance, therapeutic hot springs, and breathtaking scenery, making it an ideal destination for unwinding and connecting with nature.

When to Go: It’s best to visit Toya Devasya during the cooler months or in the early morning to enjoy the hot springs without the crowds and to witness stunning sunrise views over Lake Batur.

How to Go: Toya Devasya is located in Kintamani, approximately a 2-hour drive from Bali’s main tourist areas. Visitors can reach the resort by car or join organized tours that include transportation.

What to Do: Relax in the natural hot springs, take a dip in the infinity pool overlooking the lake, indulge in spa treatments, and savor a traditional Balinese meal at the onsite restaurant.

Free or Paid: Admission to Toya Devasya requires a fee, with various packages available for access to the hot springs and additional amenities.

Sangeh Monkey Forest, Bali

Overview: Sangeh Monkey Forest is a sacred sanctuary and ecological reserve located in the village of Sangeh, renowned for its dense jungle canopy and playful population of long-tailed macaques.

History: Originally established as a spiritual retreat for meditation and contemplation, Sangeh Monkey Forest is home to centuries-old nutmeg trees and is considered a sacred site by the local community.

Since When: Sangeh Monkey Forest has been revered as a natural sanctuary and cultural landmark for generations, attracting visitors seeking encounters with Bali’s native wildlife.

Review: Visitors to Sangeh Monkey Forest enjoy close encounters with friendly macaques amidst the lush jungle setting, but caution is advised as the monkeys can be mischievous and may snatch belongings.

When to Go: It’s recommended to visit Sangeh Monkey Forest in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the midday heat and crowds, and to observe the monkeys during their most active periods.

How to Go: Sangeh Monkey Forest is located in the village of Sangeh, approximately a 1-hour drive from Ubud or Denpasar. Visitors can reach the forest by car or motorcycle, with parking available onsite.

What to Do: Explore the forest trails, observe the playful antics of the resident macaques, visit the sacred temples within the sanctuary, and learn about the cultural significance of the site.

Free or Paid: Admission to Sangeh Monkey Forest requires a small fee, which helps support conservation efforts and the maintenance of the sanctuary.

Big Garden Corner, Bali

Overview: Big Garden Corner is a whimsical botanical garden and photography hotspot located in Bedugul, featuring colorful floral displays, themed gardens, and Instagram-worthy photo opportunities.

History: Inspired by the concept of immersive art installations and floral design, Big Garden Corner was created as a creative space where visitors can interact with nature and capture memorable photos.

Since When: Big Garden Corner opened its doors to the public as a unique tourist attraction in Bedugul, offering a blend of horticulture, landscape design, and visual artistry.

Review: Visitors rave about the enchanting beauty and creative design of Big Garden Corner, describing it as a paradise for nature lovers and photography enthusiasts alike.

When to Go: It’s recommended to visit Big Garden Corner during the morning or late afternoon when the lighting is optimal for photography, and the garden is less crowded.

How to Go: Big Garden Corner is located in Bedugul, approximately a 2-hour drive from Bali’s main tourist areas. Visitors can reach the garden by car or join guided tours that include transportation.

What to Do: Wander through the themed gardens, pose for photos amidst the vibrant flowers and whimsical sculptures, relax in the tranquil surroundings, and enjoy panoramic views of the surrounding hills.

Free or Paid: Admission to Big Garden Corner requires a fee for entry, with discounts available for children and groups.


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